Alternative mechanisms for tiotropium

E. D. Bateman, S. Rennard, P. J. Barnes, P. V. Dicpinigaitis, R. Gosens, N. J. Gross, J. A. Nadel, M. Pfeifer, K. Racké, K. F. Rabe, B. K. Rubin, T. Welte, I. Wessler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

85 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Tiotropium is commonly used in the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Although largely considered to be a long-acting bronchodilator, its demonstrated efficacy in reducing the frequency of exacerbations and preliminary evidence from early studies indicating that it might slow the rate of decline in lung function suggested mechanisms of action in addition to simple bronchodilation. This hypothesis was examined in the recently published UPLIFT study and, although spirometric and other clinical benefits of tiotropium treatment extended to four years, the rate of decline in lung function did not appear to be reduced by the addition of tiotropium in this study. This article summarizes data from a variety of investigations that provide insights into possible mechanisms to account for the effects of tiotropium. The report summarizes the discussion on basic and clinical research in this field.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)533-542
Number of pages10
JournalPulmonary Pharmacology and Therapeutics
Volume22
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2009

Fingerprint

Lung
Pulmonary diseases
Bronchodilator Agents
Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
Tiotropium Bromide
Research

Keywords

  • COPD
  • Cough
  • Inflammation
  • Mechanisms
  • Mucus
  • Remodelling
  • Tiotropium

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Biochemistry, medical
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Bateman, E. D., Rennard, S., Barnes, P. J., Dicpinigaitis, P. V., Gosens, R., Gross, N. J., ... Wessler, I. (2009). Alternative mechanisms for tiotropium. Pulmonary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, 22(6), 533-542. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pupt.2009.06.002

Alternative mechanisms for tiotropium. / Bateman, E. D.; Rennard, S.; Barnes, P. J.; Dicpinigaitis, P. V.; Gosens, R.; Gross, N. J.; Nadel, J. A.; Pfeifer, M.; Racké, K.; Rabe, K. F.; Rubin, B. K.; Welte, T.; Wessler, I.

In: Pulmonary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Vol. 22, No. 6, 01.12.2009, p. 533-542.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bateman, ED, Rennard, S, Barnes, PJ, Dicpinigaitis, PV, Gosens, R, Gross, NJ, Nadel, JA, Pfeifer, M, Racké, K, Rabe, KF, Rubin, BK, Welte, T & Wessler, I 2009, 'Alternative mechanisms for tiotropium', Pulmonary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, vol. 22, no. 6, pp. 533-542. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pupt.2009.06.002
Bateman ED, Rennard S, Barnes PJ, Dicpinigaitis PV, Gosens R, Gross NJ et al. Alternative mechanisms for tiotropium. Pulmonary Pharmacology and Therapeutics. 2009 Dec 1;22(6):533-542. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pupt.2009.06.002
Bateman, E. D. ; Rennard, S. ; Barnes, P. J. ; Dicpinigaitis, P. V. ; Gosens, R. ; Gross, N. J. ; Nadel, J. A. ; Pfeifer, M. ; Racké, K. ; Rabe, K. F. ; Rubin, B. K. ; Welte, T. ; Wessler, I. / Alternative mechanisms for tiotropium. In: Pulmonary Pharmacology and Therapeutics. 2009 ; Vol. 22, No. 6. pp. 533-542.
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