Alterations of pulse pressure stimulate arterial wall matrix remodeling

Qingping Yao, Danika M. Hayman, Qiuxia Dai, Merry L. Lindsey, Hai Chao Han

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The effect of pulse pressure on arterial wall remodeling has not been clearly defined. The objective of this study was to evaluate matrix remodeling in arteries under nonpulsatile and hyperpulsatile pressure as compared with arteries under normal pulsatile pressure. Porcine carotid arteries were cultured for 3 and 7 days under normal, nonpulsatile, and hyperpulsatile pressures with the same mean pressure and flow rate using an ex vivo organ culture model. Fenestrae in the internal elastic lamina, collagen, fibronectin, and gap junction protein connexin 43 were examined in these arteries using confocal microscopy, immunoblotting, and immunohistochemistry. Our results showed that after 7 days, the mean fenestrae size and the area fraction of fenestrae decreased significantly in nonpulsatile arteries (51% and 45%, respectively) and hyperpulsatile arteries (45% and 54%, respectively) when compared with normal pulsatile arteries. Fibronectin decreased (29.9%) in nonpulsatile arteries after 3 days but showed no change after 7 days, while collagen I levels increased significantly (106%) in hyperpulsatile arteries after 7 days. The expression of connexin 43 increased by 35.3% in hyperpulsatile arteries after 7 days but showed no difference in nonpulsatile arteries. In conclusion, our results demonstrated, for the first time, that an increase or a decrease in pulse pressure from its normal physiologic level stimulates structural changes in the arterial wall matrix. However, hyperpulsatile pressure has a more pronounced effect than the diminished pulse pressure. This effect helps to explain the correlation between increasing wall stiffness and increasing pulse pressure in vivo.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number101011-1
JournalJournal of Biomechanical Engineering
Volume131
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2009

Fingerprint

Arteries
Blood Pressure
Pressure
Connexin 43
Collagen
Fibronectins
Confocal microscopy
Connexins
Organ Culture Techniques
Carotid Arteries
Immunoblotting
Confocal Microscopy
Stiffness
Flow rate
Swine
Immunohistochemistry
Proteins

Keywords

  • Collagen
  • Connexin 43
  • Ex vivo
  • Fibronectin
  • Internal elastic lamina
  • Organ culture
  • Porcine artery
  • Pulsatile pressure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Alterations of pulse pressure stimulate arterial wall matrix remodeling. / Yao, Qingping; Hayman, Danika M.; Dai, Qiuxia; Lindsey, Merry L.; Han, Hai Chao.

In: Journal of Biomechanical Engineering, Vol. 131, No. 10, 101011-1, 01.10.2009.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yao, Qingping ; Hayman, Danika M. ; Dai, Qiuxia ; Lindsey, Merry L. ; Han, Hai Chao. / Alterations of pulse pressure stimulate arterial wall matrix remodeling. In: Journal of Biomechanical Engineering. 2009 ; Vol. 131, No. 10.
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