Allergic sensitization: Screening methods

Gregory S. Ladics, Jeremy Fry, Richard Goodman, Corinne Herouet-Guicheney, Karin Hoffmann-Sommergruber, Charlotte B. Madsen, André Penninks, Anna Pomés, Erwin L. Roggen, Joost Smit, Jean Michel Wal

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Experimental in silico, in vitro, and rodent models for screening and predicting protein sensitizing potential are discussed, including whether there is evidence of new sensitizations and allergies since the introduction of genetically modified crops in 1996, the importance of linear versus conformational epitopes, and protein families that become allergens. Some common challenges for predicting protein sensitization are addressed: (a) exposure routes; (b) frequency and dose of exposure; (c) dose-response relationships; (d) role of digestion, food processing, and the food matrix; (e) role of infection; (f) role of the gut microbiota; (g) influence of the structure and physicochemical properties of the protein; and (h) the genetic background and physiology of consumers. The consensus view is that sensitization screening models are not yet validated to definitively predict the de novo sensitizing potential of a novel protein. However, they would be extremely useful in the discovery and research phases of understanding the mechanisms of food allergy development, and may prove fruitful to provide information regarding potential allergenicity risk assessment of future products on a case by case basis. These data and findings were presented at a 2012 international symposium in Prague organized by the Protein Allergenicity Technical Committee of the International Life Sciences Institute's Health and Environmental Sciences Institute.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number13
JournalClinical and Translational Allergy
Volume4
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 15 2014

Fingerprint

Proteins
Food Handling
Food Hypersensitivity
Environmental Health
Biological Science Disciplines
Computer Simulation
Allergens
Epitopes
Digestion
Rodentia
Hypersensitivity
Food
Infection
Research
Gastrointestinal Microbiome
In Vitro Techniques
Genetic Background

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

Ladics, G. S., Fry, J., Goodman, R., Herouet-Guicheney, C., Hoffmann-Sommergruber, K., Madsen, C. B., ... Wal, J. M. (2014). Allergic sensitization: Screening methods. Clinical and Translational Allergy, 4(1), [13]. https://doi.org/10.1186/2045-7022-4-13

Allergic sensitization : Screening methods. / Ladics, Gregory S.; Fry, Jeremy; Goodman, Richard; Herouet-Guicheney, Corinne; Hoffmann-Sommergruber, Karin; Madsen, Charlotte B.; Penninks, André; Pomés, Anna; Roggen, Erwin L.; Smit, Joost; Wal, Jean Michel.

In: Clinical and Translational Allergy, Vol. 4, No. 1, 13, 15.04.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Ladics, GS, Fry, J, Goodman, R, Herouet-Guicheney, C, Hoffmann-Sommergruber, K, Madsen, CB, Penninks, A, Pomés, A, Roggen, EL, Smit, J & Wal, JM 2014, 'Allergic sensitization: Screening methods', Clinical and Translational Allergy, vol. 4, no. 1, 13. https://doi.org/10.1186/2045-7022-4-13
Ladics GS, Fry J, Goodman R, Herouet-Guicheney C, Hoffmann-Sommergruber K, Madsen CB et al. Allergic sensitization: Screening methods. Clinical and Translational Allergy. 2014 Apr 15;4(1). 13. https://doi.org/10.1186/2045-7022-4-13
Ladics, Gregory S. ; Fry, Jeremy ; Goodman, Richard ; Herouet-Guicheney, Corinne ; Hoffmann-Sommergruber, Karin ; Madsen, Charlotte B. ; Penninks, André ; Pomés, Anna ; Roggen, Erwin L. ; Smit, Joost ; Wal, Jean Michel. / Allergic sensitization : Screening methods. In: Clinical and Translational Allergy. 2014 ; Vol. 4, No. 1.
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