Age-dependent cyclosporine: Pharmacokinetics in marrow transplant recipients

Gary C. Yee, Thomas P. Lennon, Dennis J. Gmur, Michael S. Kennedy, H. Joachim Deeg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

We evaluated the effect of age on cyclosporine pharmacokinetics in 69 nonobese patients aged 10 months to 56 years (median 22 years) undergoing allogeneic bone marrow transplantation for treatment of aplastic anemia or hematologic malignancy. Cyclosporine pharmacokinetics were studied during the first 2 posttransplant weeks after an intravenous dose of 2.6 to 3.5 mg/kg. Serum cyclosporine concentrations were measured by HPLC. Cyclosporine concentration-time data were fitted to a two-compartment model with a nonlinear regression program. There was a significant inverse linear correlation between age and both total systemic clearance (CL) (r = 0.42; P < 0.001) and volume of distribution at steady-state (Vss) (r = 0.33; P < 0.01). Mean (± SE) cyclosporine CL was 82 ± 21,45 ± 5, 38 ± 9,44 ± 8, and 20 ± 3 ml/min/kg and mean cyclosporine Vss was 34 ± 11, 28 ± 10, 15 ± 4, 14 ± 5, and 4.7 ± 0.7 L/kg in patients 0 to 10 (n = 12), 11 to 20 (n = 19), 21 to 30 (n = 12), 31 to 4o (n = 17), and >40 (n = 9) years old, respectively. Patients 0 to 10 years old had a significantly higher cyclosporine CL than those 11 to 40 or >40 years old and also had a significantly larger Vss than those >40 yrs old (P < 0.05). Age-related differences in CL or Vss were also observed when these parameters were normalized by body surface area. Multiple stepwise regression showed that other factors, such as serum bilirubin, alkaline phosphatase, creatinine, or BUN, did not correlate with cyclosporine CL or Vss. Thus since infants and children have a more rapid CL and larger Vss than adults, they require larger cyclosporine doses to achieve comparable serum cyclosporine concentrations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)438-443
Number of pages6
JournalClinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics
Volume40
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1986

Fingerprint

Cyclosporine
Pharmacokinetics
Bone Marrow
Serum
Transplant Recipients
Aplastic Anemia
Body Surface Area
Blood Urea Nitrogen
Homologous Transplantation
Hematologic Neoplasms
Bone Marrow Transplantation
Bilirubin
Alkaline Phosphatase
Creatinine
High Pressure Liquid Chromatography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Age-dependent cyclosporine : Pharmacokinetics in marrow transplant recipients. / Yee, Gary C.; Lennon, Thomas P.; Gmur, Dennis J.; Kennedy, Michael S.; Deeg, H. Joachim.

In: Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Vol. 40, No. 4, 10.1986, p. 438-443.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yee, Gary C. ; Lennon, Thomas P. ; Gmur, Dennis J. ; Kennedy, Michael S. ; Deeg, H. Joachim. / Age-dependent cyclosporine : Pharmacokinetics in marrow transplant recipients. In: Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics. 1986 ; Vol. 40, No. 4. pp. 438-443.
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