Affective Well-Being in Retirement

The Influence of Values, Money, and Health Across Three Years

Andrew Burr, Jonathan Santo, Dolores Pushkar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this study, personal values, health, and financial status were investigated as determinants of affective well-being in a sample of 371 recent retirees across 3 years. Personal values, measured with the Portrait Value Questionnaire (Schwartz et al. in J Cross Cult Psychol 32:519-542, 2001), were hypothesized to show direct links to positive affect (PA) and negative affect (NA) as well as to moderate the association between financial and health status and affective well-being. Using structural equation modeling, higher PA was predicted by female gender, better finances, fewer illnesses, and higher self-transcendence (ST), openness to change (OC), and conservation values. Higher NA was predicted by female gender, lower finances, more illnesses, higher self-enhancement (SE) and lower OC values. SE and OC values also moderated the association between financial status and PA. Longitudinal analyses indicated a relatively stable pattern of associations across 3 years. While the impact of finances on affect was stable over time, the effects of health and values increased across 3 years.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)17-40
Number of pages24
JournalJournal of Happiness Studies
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2011

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purchasing power
retirement
well-being
value change
health
finance
Values
illness
retiree
transcendence
gender
ritual
health status
conservation
determinants
questionnaire

Keywords

  • Finance
  • Health
  • Retirement
  • Subjective well-being
  • Values

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Affective Well-Being in Retirement : The Influence of Values, Money, and Health Across Three Years. / Burr, Andrew; Santo, Jonathan; Pushkar, Dolores.

In: Journal of Happiness Studies, Vol. 12, No. 1, 01.03.2011, p. 17-40.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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