Advancing career counseling and employment support for survivors: an intervention evaluation.

M. Meghan Davidson, Camie Nitzel, Alysondra Duke, Cynthia M. Baker, James A. Bovaird

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this research was to conduct a replication-based and extension study examining the effectiveness of a 5-week career group counseling intervention, Advancing Career Counseling and Employment Support for Survivors (ACCESS; Chronister, 2008). The present study was conducted in a markedly different geographic region within a larger community as compared with the original investigation conducted by Chronister and McWhirter (2006). Women survivors of intimate partner violence (N = 73) participated in ACCESS, with career-search self-efficacy, perceived career barriers, perceived career supports, anxiety, and depression assessed at preintervention, postintervention, and 8-week follow-up. Women survivors demonstrated significant improvements in career-search self-efficacy and perceived career barriers at postintervention. Moreover, these same improvements were maintained at the 8-week follow-up assessment with the addition of significant improvements in perceived future financial supports, anxiety, and depression compared with preintervention scores. This work replicates the initial findings regarding the effectiveness of ACCESS with respect to career-search self-efficacy (Chronister & McWhirter, 2006) as well as extends the initial research to include improvements in perceived career barriers and perceived career supports. Moreover, the present study extends the work to include the mental health outcomes of anxiety and depression; results demonstrated improvements in these areas at 8-week follow-up. This investigation begins to fill a critical need for evaluated career-focused interventions for the underserved population of women survivors of intimate partner violence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)321-328
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of counseling psychology
Volume59
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2012

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Vocational Guidance
Survivors
Self Efficacy
Anxiety
Depression
Financial Support
Vulnerable Populations
Research
Mental Health
Intimate Partner Violence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Advancing career counseling and employment support for survivors : an intervention evaluation. / Davidson, M. Meghan; Nitzel, Camie; Duke, Alysondra; Baker, Cynthia M.; Bovaird, James A.

In: Journal of counseling psychology, Vol. 59, No. 2, 04.2012, p. 321-328.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Davidson, M. Meghan ; Nitzel, Camie ; Duke, Alysondra ; Baker, Cynthia M. ; Bovaird, James A. / Advancing career counseling and employment support for survivors : an intervention evaluation. In: Journal of counseling psychology. 2012 ; Vol. 59, No. 2. pp. 321-328.
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