Adult social capital and track placement of ethnic groups in Germany

Simon Cheng, Leslie Martin, Regina E. Werum

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The dictum that "context matters" notwithstanding, few researchers have focused on how social capital affects educational outcomes for ethnic groups outside of the United States. Using German Socioeconomic Panel (GSOEP) data, analyses highlight the group-specific effects of parental social capital on track placement among 11-16-year-old German and non-German students. For both groups, parents' family ties fail to affect track placement. Parents' community ties have mixed effects. Among Germans, parental involvement in sports affects children's tracking positively. Among non-Germans, parental socializing with peers affects track placement negatively, while parental involvement in religion-based community groups and interethnic ties with Germans improve track placement chances. We relate these findings to different strands of social capital theory.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)41-74
Number of pages34
JournalAmerican Journal of Education
Volume114
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 23 2007

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social capital
ethnic group
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Religion
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  • Education

Cite this

Adult social capital and track placement of ethnic groups in Germany. / Cheng, Simon; Martin, Leslie; Werum, Regina E.

In: American Journal of Education, Vol. 114, No. 1, 23.10.2007, p. 41-74.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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