Addressing services’ intangibility through integrated marketing communication

An exploratory study

Stephen J. Grove, Leslie C Carlson, Michael J. Dorsch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this study, we examined the degree to which integrated marketing communication (IMC) might be manifested in services advertising. Using one of Lovelock's typologies of services as a framework for classifying different services with respect to their tangibility, we examined ads in each of four service product categories to assess advertisers’ efforts to address the tangibility of service offerings via IMC. We found few differences with regard to incorporation of IMC across four service types, with the exception that services advertisements that reflected tangible acts (lawn care, hairstyling) were more highly integrated than services ads for intangible acts (education, retailing, banking). Results are discussed in terms of the implications for developing better services advertising.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)393-411
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Services Marketing
Volume16
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2002

Fingerprint

Exploratory study
Integrated marketing communications
Banking
Integrated
Education
Retailing
Intangibles
Product category

Keywords

  • Advertising
  • Intangibility
  • Marketing communications
  • Services

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Marketing

Cite this

Addressing services’ intangibility through integrated marketing communication : An exploratory study. / Grove, Stephen J.; Carlson, Leslie C; Dorsch, Michael J.

In: Journal of Services Marketing, Vol. 16, No. 5, 01.09.2002, p. 393-411.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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