Addicted to Hate: Identity Residual among Former White Supremacists

Pete Simi, Kathleen Blee, Matthew DeMichele, Steven Windisch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The process of leaving deeply meaningful and embodied identities can be experienced as a struggle against addiction, with continuing cognitive, emotional, and physiological responses that are involuntary, unwanted, and triggered by environmental factors. Using data derived from a unique set of in-depth life history interviews with 89 former U.S. white supremacists, as well as theories derived from recent advances in cognitive sociology, we examine how a rejected identity can persist despite a desire to change. Disengagement from white supremacy is characterized by substantial lingering effects that subjects describe as addiction. We conclude with a discussion of the implications of identity residual for understanding how people leave and for theories of the self.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1167-1187
Number of pages21
JournalAmerican Sociological Review
Volume82
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2017

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hate
addiction
disengagement
environmental factors
sociology
interview

Keywords

  • addiction
  • culture
  • identity
  • racism
  • symbolic interactionism

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

Addicted to Hate : Identity Residual among Former White Supremacists. / Simi, Pete; Blee, Kathleen; DeMichele, Matthew; Windisch, Steven.

In: American Sociological Review, Vol. 82, No. 6, 01.12.2017, p. 1167-1187.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Simi, Pete ; Blee, Kathleen ; DeMichele, Matthew ; Windisch, Steven. / Addicted to Hate : Identity Residual among Former White Supremacists. In: American Sociological Review. 2017 ; Vol. 82, No. 6. pp. 1167-1187.
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