Acute hypoxia and exercise-induced blood oxidative stress

Graham McGinnis, Brian Kliszczewiscz, Matthew Barberio, Christopher Ballmann, Bridget Peters, Dustin R Slivka, Charles Dumke, John Cuddy, Walter Hailes, Brent Ruby, John Quindry

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    15 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Hypoxic exercise is characterized by workloads decrements. Because exercise and high altitude independently elicit redox perturbations, the study purpose was to examine hypoxic and normoxic steady-state exercise on blood oxidative stress. Active males (n = 11) completed graded cycle ergometry in normoxic (975 m) and hypoxic (3,000 m) simulated environments before programing subsequent matched intensity or workload steady-state trials. In a randomized counterbalanced crossover design, participants completed three 60-min exercise bouts to investigate the effects of hypoxia and exercise intensity on blood oxidative stress. Exercise conditions were paired as such; 60% normoxic VO2peak performed in a normoxic environment (normoxic intensity-normoxic environment, NI-NE), 60% hypoxic VO2peak performed in a normoxic environment (HI-NE), and 60% hypoxic VO2peak performed in a hypoxic environment (HI-HE). Blood plasma samples drawn pre (Pre), 0 (Post), 2 (2HR) and 4 (4HR) hr post exercise were analyzed for oxidative stress biomarkers including ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP), trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC), lipid hydroperoxides (LOOH) and protein carbonyls (PCs). Repeated-measures ANOVA were performed, a priori significance of p ≤ .05. Oxygen saturation during the HI-HE trial was lower than NI-NE and HI-NE (p < .05). A Time × Trial interaction was present for LOOH (p = .013). In the HI-HE trial, LOOH were elevated for all time points post while PC (time; p = .001) decreased post exercise. As evidenced by the decrease in absolute workload during hypoxic VO2peak and LOOH increased during HI-HE versus normoxic exercise of equal absolute (HI-NE) and relative (NI-NE) intensities. Results suggest acute hypoxia elicits work decrements associated with post exercise oxidative stress.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)684-693
    Number of pages10
    JournalInternational Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism
    Volume24
    Issue number6
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Dec 1 2014

    Fingerprint

    Oxidative Stress
    Exercise
    Workload
    Ergometry
    Lipid Peroxides
    Hypoxia
    Cross-Over Studies
    Oxidation-Reduction
    Analysis of Variance
    Proteins
    Antioxidants
    Biomarkers
    Oxygen

    Keywords

    • Altitude
    • Cycling exercise
    • Environmental physiology
    • Reactive oxygen species

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Medicine (miscellaneous)
    • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
    • Nutrition and Dietetics

    Cite this

    Acute hypoxia and exercise-induced blood oxidative stress. / McGinnis, Graham; Kliszczewiscz, Brian; Barberio, Matthew; Ballmann, Christopher; Peters, Bridget; Slivka, Dustin R; Dumke, Charles; Cuddy, John; Hailes, Walter; Ruby, Brent; Quindry, John.

    In: International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism, Vol. 24, No. 6, 01.12.2014, p. 684-693.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    McGinnis, G, Kliszczewiscz, B, Barberio, M, Ballmann, C, Peters, B, Slivka, DR, Dumke, C, Cuddy, J, Hailes, W, Ruby, B & Quindry, J 2014, 'Acute hypoxia and exercise-induced blood oxidative stress', International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism, vol. 24, no. 6, pp. 684-693. https://doi.org/10.1123/ijsnem.2013-0188
    McGinnis, Graham ; Kliszczewiscz, Brian ; Barberio, Matthew ; Ballmann, Christopher ; Peters, Bridget ; Slivka, Dustin R ; Dumke, Charles ; Cuddy, John ; Hailes, Walter ; Ruby, Brent ; Quindry, John. / Acute hypoxia and exercise-induced blood oxidative stress. In: International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism. 2014 ; Vol. 24, No. 6. pp. 684-693.
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    AU - Dumke, Charles

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