Acculturation in the United States Is Associated with Lower Serum Carotenoid Levels: Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

Jim P. Stimpson, Ximena Urrutia-Rojas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined the association of acculturation in the United States and serum carotenoid levels. The design was a cross-sectional, nationally representative survey of 16,539 participants, 17 years of age and older, from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III). The main outcome measures were serum levels of α-carotene, β-carotene, β-cryptoxanthin, lutein/zeaxanthin, lycopene, and total carotenoids. Multivariate linear regression was used to model the association of serum carotenoids and country of birth, language of interview, and years in the United States. Adjustments were made for age, sex, years of education, race/ethnicity, body mass index, alcohol use, physical activity, serum cotinine, serum cholesterol, and vitamin/mineral usage. Individuals born in the United States who speak English had the lowest levels of carotenoids, and individuals born in Mexico had the highest levels of carotenoids, with the exception of lycopene. Years of residence in the United States was associated with lower α-carotene (4.18 vs 1.51), β-carotene (20.21 vs 14.87), β-cryptoxanthin (12.51 vs 8.95), lutein/zeaxanthin (25.15 vs 18.03), and total carotenoids (88.79 vs 75.44). Years residence in the United States was positively associated with higher lycopene levels (26.69 vs 32.03). Acculturation in the United States was associated with lower fruit and vegetable intake, as measured by serum carotenoid levels.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1218-1223
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the American Dietetic Association
Volume107
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2007

Fingerprint

acculturation
Acculturation
National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey
Nutrition Surveys
Carotenoids
carotenoids
carotenes
Serum
lycopene
zeaxanthin
lutein
Lutein
vegetable consumption
fruit consumption
nationalities and ethnic groups
physical activity
body mass index
vitamins
interviews
education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

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Acculturation in the United States Is Associated with Lower Serum Carotenoid Levels : Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. / Stimpson, Jim P.; Urrutia-Rojas, Ximena.

In: Journal of the American Dietetic Association, Vol. 107, No. 7, 01.07.2007, p. 1218-1223.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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