Acculturation and sun-safe behaviors among US Latinos

Findings from the 2005 Health Information National Trends Survey

Valentina A. Andreeva, Jennifer B. Unger, Amy L Yaroch, Myles G. Cockburn, Lourdes Baezconde-Garbanati, Kim D. Reynolds

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

42 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives. We examined the relationship between acculturation and sun safety among US Latinos. Methods. We used linear regression models to analyze data from 496 Latino respondents to the 2005 Health Information National Trends Survey. Using sunscreen, seeking shade, and wearing protective clothing were the primary outcomes and were assessed by frequency scales. Acculturation was assessed with a composite index. Results. In bivariate models, acculturation was negatively associated with use of shade and protective clothing and positively associated with sunscreen use (all, P≤.004). In adjusted models, acculturation was negatively associated with seeking shade and wearing protective clothing across gender and region of residence (all, P≤.05). Conclusions. Our results demonstrated both adverse and beneficial effects of acculturation on Latinos' risk behaviors relating to skin cancer. Education about sun safety is needed for all Latinos and should be tailored to different levels of acculturation. Initiatives for Latinos who are not yet acculturated could focus on reinforcing existing sun-safe behaviors and presenting new ones, such as use of sunscreen; initiatives for highly acculturated Latinos might require more resources because the objective is behavior modification.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)734-741
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican journal of public health
Volume99
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2009

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Acculturation
Solar System
Hispanic Americans
Protective Clothing
Sunscreening Agents
Health
Linear Models
Safety
Behavior Therapy
Skin Neoplasms
Risk-Taking
Surveys and Questionnaires
Education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Andreeva, V. A., Unger, J. B., Yaroch, A. L., Cockburn, M. G., Baezconde-Garbanati, L., & Reynolds, K. D. (2009). Acculturation and sun-safe behaviors among US Latinos: Findings from the 2005 Health Information National Trends Survey. American journal of public health, 99(4), 734-741. https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2007.122796

Acculturation and sun-safe behaviors among US Latinos : Findings from the 2005 Health Information National Trends Survey. / Andreeva, Valentina A.; Unger, Jennifer B.; Yaroch, Amy L; Cockburn, Myles G.; Baezconde-Garbanati, Lourdes; Reynolds, Kim D.

In: American journal of public health, Vol. 99, No. 4, 01.04.2009, p. 734-741.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Andreeva, VA, Unger, JB, Yaroch, AL, Cockburn, MG, Baezconde-Garbanati, L & Reynolds, KD 2009, 'Acculturation and sun-safe behaviors among US Latinos: Findings from the 2005 Health Information National Trends Survey', American journal of public health, vol. 99, no. 4, pp. 734-741. https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2007.122796
Andreeva, Valentina A. ; Unger, Jennifer B. ; Yaroch, Amy L ; Cockburn, Myles G. ; Baezconde-Garbanati, Lourdes ; Reynolds, Kim D. / Acculturation and sun-safe behaviors among US Latinos : Findings from the 2005 Health Information National Trends Survey. In: American journal of public health. 2009 ; Vol. 99, No. 4. pp. 734-741.
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