ABA signaling is necessary but not sufficient for RD29B transcriptional memory during successive dehydration stresses in Arabidopsis thaliana

Laetitia Virlouvet, Yong Ding, Hiroaki Fujii, Zoya Avramova, Michael Fromm

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Plants subjected to a prior dehydration stress were seen to have altered transcriptional responses during a subsequent dehydration stress for up to 5 days after the initial stress. The abscisic acid (ABA) inducible RD29B gene of Arabidopsis thaliana was strongly induced after the first stress and displayed transcriptional memory with transcript levels nine-fold higher during the second dehydration stress. These increased transcript levels were due to an increased rate of transcription and are associated with an altered chromatin template during the recovery interval between the dehydration stresses. Here we use a combination of promoter deletion/substitutions, mutants in the trans-acting transcription factors and their upstream protein kinases, and treatments with exogenous ABA or dehydration stress to advance our understanding of the features required for transcriptional memory of RD29B. ABA Response Elements (ABREs) are sufficient to confer transcriptional memory on a minimal promoter, although there is a context effect from flanking sequences. Different mutations in Snf1 Related Protein Kinase 2 (SnRK2) genes positively and negatively affected the response, suggesting that this effect is important for transcriptional memory. Although exogenous ABA treatments could prime transcriptional memory, a second ABA treatment was not sufficient to activate transcriptional memory. Therefore, we concluded that transcriptional memory requires ABA and an ABA-independent factor that is induced or activated by a subsequent dehydration stress and directly or indirectly results in a more active RD29B chromatin template. These results advance our knowledge of the cis- and trans-acting factors that are required for transcriptional memory of RD29B.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)150-161
Number of pages12
JournalPlant Journal
Volume79
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2014

Fingerprint

Abscisic Acid
desiccation (plant physiology)
Dehydration
Arabidopsis
abscisic acid
Arabidopsis thaliana
Trans-Activators
acid treatment
protein kinases
Protein Kinases
Chromatin
chromatin
promoter regions
response elements
Response Elements
Genes
Transcription Factors
genes
transcription factors
transcription (genetics)

Keywords

  • ABRE
  • Arabidopsis thaliana
  • RD29B
  • SnRK2
  • abscisic acid
  • dehydration stress
  • transcriptional memory

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • Plant Science
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

ABA signaling is necessary but not sufficient for RD29B transcriptional memory during successive dehydration stresses in Arabidopsis thaliana. / Virlouvet, Laetitia; Ding, Yong; Fujii, Hiroaki; Avramova, Zoya; Fromm, Michael.

In: Plant Journal, Vol. 79, No. 1, 07.2014, p. 150-161.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{965e4c6f03f44b668f7b9d264dd9e438,
title = "ABA signaling is necessary but not sufficient for RD29B transcriptional memory during successive dehydration stresses in Arabidopsis thaliana",
abstract = "Plants subjected to a prior dehydration stress were seen to have altered transcriptional responses during a subsequent dehydration stress for up to 5 days after the initial stress. The abscisic acid (ABA) inducible RD29B gene of Arabidopsis thaliana was strongly induced after the first stress and displayed transcriptional memory with transcript levels nine-fold higher during the second dehydration stress. These increased transcript levels were due to an increased rate of transcription and are associated with an altered chromatin template during the recovery interval between the dehydration stresses. Here we use a combination of promoter deletion/substitutions, mutants in the trans-acting transcription factors and their upstream protein kinases, and treatments with exogenous ABA or dehydration stress to advance our understanding of the features required for transcriptional memory of RD29B. ABA Response Elements (ABREs) are sufficient to confer transcriptional memory on a minimal promoter, although there is a context effect from flanking sequences. Different mutations in Snf1 Related Protein Kinase 2 (SnRK2) genes positively and negatively affected the response, suggesting that this effect is important for transcriptional memory. Although exogenous ABA treatments could prime transcriptional memory, a second ABA treatment was not sufficient to activate transcriptional memory. Therefore, we concluded that transcriptional memory requires ABA and an ABA-independent factor that is induced or activated by a subsequent dehydration stress and directly or indirectly results in a more active RD29B chromatin template. These results advance our knowledge of the cis- and trans-acting factors that are required for transcriptional memory of RD29B.",
keywords = "ABRE, Arabidopsis thaliana, RD29B, SnRK2, abscisic acid, dehydration stress, transcriptional memory",
author = "Laetitia Virlouvet and Yong Ding and Hiroaki Fujii and Zoya Avramova and Michael Fromm",
year = "2014",
month = "7",
doi = "10.1111/tpj.12548",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "79",
pages = "150--161",
journal = "Plant Journal",
issn = "0960-7412",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - ABA signaling is necessary but not sufficient for RD29B transcriptional memory during successive dehydration stresses in Arabidopsis thaliana

AU - Virlouvet, Laetitia

AU - Ding, Yong

AU - Fujii, Hiroaki

AU - Avramova, Zoya

AU - Fromm, Michael

PY - 2014/7

Y1 - 2014/7

N2 - Plants subjected to a prior dehydration stress were seen to have altered transcriptional responses during a subsequent dehydration stress for up to 5 days after the initial stress. The abscisic acid (ABA) inducible RD29B gene of Arabidopsis thaliana was strongly induced after the first stress and displayed transcriptional memory with transcript levels nine-fold higher during the second dehydration stress. These increased transcript levels were due to an increased rate of transcription and are associated with an altered chromatin template during the recovery interval between the dehydration stresses. Here we use a combination of promoter deletion/substitutions, mutants in the trans-acting transcription factors and their upstream protein kinases, and treatments with exogenous ABA or dehydration stress to advance our understanding of the features required for transcriptional memory of RD29B. ABA Response Elements (ABREs) are sufficient to confer transcriptional memory on a minimal promoter, although there is a context effect from flanking sequences. Different mutations in Snf1 Related Protein Kinase 2 (SnRK2) genes positively and negatively affected the response, suggesting that this effect is important for transcriptional memory. Although exogenous ABA treatments could prime transcriptional memory, a second ABA treatment was not sufficient to activate transcriptional memory. Therefore, we concluded that transcriptional memory requires ABA and an ABA-independent factor that is induced or activated by a subsequent dehydration stress and directly or indirectly results in a more active RD29B chromatin template. These results advance our knowledge of the cis- and trans-acting factors that are required for transcriptional memory of RD29B.

AB - Plants subjected to a prior dehydration stress were seen to have altered transcriptional responses during a subsequent dehydration stress for up to 5 days after the initial stress. The abscisic acid (ABA) inducible RD29B gene of Arabidopsis thaliana was strongly induced after the first stress and displayed transcriptional memory with transcript levels nine-fold higher during the second dehydration stress. These increased transcript levels were due to an increased rate of transcription and are associated with an altered chromatin template during the recovery interval between the dehydration stresses. Here we use a combination of promoter deletion/substitutions, mutants in the trans-acting transcription factors and their upstream protein kinases, and treatments with exogenous ABA or dehydration stress to advance our understanding of the features required for transcriptional memory of RD29B. ABA Response Elements (ABREs) are sufficient to confer transcriptional memory on a minimal promoter, although there is a context effect from flanking sequences. Different mutations in Snf1 Related Protein Kinase 2 (SnRK2) genes positively and negatively affected the response, suggesting that this effect is important for transcriptional memory. Although exogenous ABA treatments could prime transcriptional memory, a second ABA treatment was not sufficient to activate transcriptional memory. Therefore, we concluded that transcriptional memory requires ABA and an ABA-independent factor that is induced or activated by a subsequent dehydration stress and directly or indirectly results in a more active RD29B chromatin template. These results advance our knowledge of the cis- and trans-acting factors that are required for transcriptional memory of RD29B.

KW - ABRE

KW - Arabidopsis thaliana

KW - RD29B

KW - SnRK2

KW - abscisic acid

KW - dehydration stress

KW - transcriptional memory

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84903301309&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84903301309&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/tpj.12548

DO - 10.1111/tpj.12548

M3 - Article

C2 - 24805058

AN - SCOPUS:84903301309

VL - 79

SP - 150

EP - 161

JO - Plant Journal

JF - Plant Journal

SN - 0960-7412

IS - 1

ER -