AAC Menu interface: Effectiveness of active versus passive learning to master abbreviation-expansion codes

Ellyn Gregory, Melinda Soderman, Christy Ward, David R. Beukelman, Karen Hux

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study investigated the accuracy with which 30 young adults without disabilities learned abbreviation expansion codes associated with specific vocabulary items that were stored in an AAC device with two accessing methods: Mouse access and keyboard access. Both accessing methods utilized a specialized computer application, called AAC Menu, which allowed for errorless practice. Mouse access prompted passive learning, whereas keyboard access prompted active learning. Results revealed that participants who accessed words via a keyboard demonstrated significantly higher mastery of abbreviation-expansion codes than those who accessed words via a computer mouse.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)77-84
Number of pages8
JournalAAC: Augmentative and Alternative Communication
Volume22
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2006

Fingerprint

Learning
Computer applications
Problem-Based Learning
Vocabulary
Young Adult
Equipment and Supplies
Practice (Psychology)

Keywords

  • Augmentative and alternative communication
  • Computer application
  • Encoding

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation
  • Speech and Hearing

Cite this

AAC Menu interface : Effectiveness of active versus passive learning to master abbreviation-expansion codes. / Gregory, Ellyn; Soderman, Melinda; Ward, Christy; Beukelman, David R.; Hux, Karen.

In: AAC: Augmentative and Alternative Communication, Vol. 22, No. 2, 01.06.2006, p. 77-84.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gregory, Ellyn ; Soderman, Melinda ; Ward, Christy ; Beukelman, David R. ; Hux, Karen. / AAC Menu interface : Effectiveness of active versus passive learning to master abbreviation-expansion codes. In: AAC: Augmentative and Alternative Communication. 2006 ; Vol. 22, No. 2. pp. 77-84.
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