A twin and family study of the association between immune system dysfunction and dyslexia using blood serum immunoassay and survey data

Jeffrey W. Gilger, Bruce F. Pennington, Ronald J. Harbeck, John C. Defries, Brian Kotzin, Phyllis Green, Shelley Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We conducted a study of the association between developmental reading disability (DRD) and immune disorders (ID) using both survey and immunoassay data in tWO separate samples of families. One sample was made up of twins and their parents and was ascertained through a population-based sampling scheme. The other sample was a set of extended pedigrees selected for apparent autosomal dominant transmission of DRD. We failed to find an association between DRD and ID in either sample, regardless of the method used to assess immune system function. Even though our twin sample provided evidence that both DRD and immune conditions were significantly heritable, there was no evidence for a genetic correlation between ID and DRD nor was there any clear indication that a special subgroup of individuals may be comorbid for these conditions because of genetic reasons. How these negative findings can be reconciled with the developmental hypothesis of Geschwind, Behan, Galaburda, and colleagues, and how they may relate to the gene locus influencing DRD that has been recently located in the HLA region of the short aim of chromosome 6 is discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)310-333
Number of pages24
JournalBrain and Cognition
Volume36
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1998

Fingerprint

Dyslexia
Twin Studies
Immunoassay
Immune System
Serum
Immune System Diseases
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 6
Surveys and Questionnaires
Blood
Survey Data
Pedigree
Reading Disability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Cognitive Neuroscience

Cite this

A twin and family study of the association between immune system dysfunction and dyslexia using blood serum immunoassay and survey data. / Gilger, Jeffrey W.; Pennington, Bruce F.; Harbeck, Ronald J.; Defries, John C.; Kotzin, Brian; Green, Phyllis; Smith, Shelley.

In: Brain and Cognition, Vol. 36, No. 3, 04.1998, p. 310-333.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gilger, Jeffrey W. ; Pennington, Bruce F. ; Harbeck, Ronald J. ; Defries, John C. ; Kotzin, Brian ; Green, Phyllis ; Smith, Shelley. / A twin and family study of the association between immune system dysfunction and dyslexia using blood serum immunoassay and survey data. In: Brain and Cognition. 1998 ; Vol. 36, No. 3. pp. 310-333.
@article{9864af41acf7478abbdca544edc131ff,
title = "A twin and family study of the association between immune system dysfunction and dyslexia using blood serum immunoassay and survey data",
abstract = "We conducted a study of the association between developmental reading disability (DRD) and immune disorders (ID) using both survey and immunoassay data in tWO separate samples of families. One sample was made up of twins and their parents and was ascertained through a population-based sampling scheme. The other sample was a set of extended pedigrees selected for apparent autosomal dominant transmission of DRD. We failed to find an association between DRD and ID in either sample, regardless of the method used to assess immune system function. Even though our twin sample provided evidence that both DRD and immune conditions were significantly heritable, there was no evidence for a genetic correlation between ID and DRD nor was there any clear indication that a special subgroup of individuals may be comorbid for these conditions because of genetic reasons. How these negative findings can be reconciled with the developmental hypothesis of Geschwind, Behan, Galaburda, and colleagues, and how they may relate to the gene locus influencing DRD that has been recently located in the HLA region of the short aim of chromosome 6 is discussed.",
author = "Gilger, {Jeffrey W.} and Pennington, {Bruce F.} and Harbeck, {Ronald J.} and Defries, {John C.} and Brian Kotzin and Phyllis Green and Shelley Smith",
year = "1998",
month = "4",
doi = "10.1006/brcg.1997.0972",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "36",
pages = "310--333",
journal = "Brain and Cognition",
issn = "0278-2626",
publisher = "Academic Press Inc.",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - A twin and family study of the association between immune system dysfunction and dyslexia using blood serum immunoassay and survey data

AU - Gilger, Jeffrey W.

AU - Pennington, Bruce F.

AU - Harbeck, Ronald J.

AU - Defries, John C.

AU - Kotzin, Brian

AU - Green, Phyllis

AU - Smith, Shelley

PY - 1998/4

Y1 - 1998/4

N2 - We conducted a study of the association between developmental reading disability (DRD) and immune disorders (ID) using both survey and immunoassay data in tWO separate samples of families. One sample was made up of twins and their parents and was ascertained through a population-based sampling scheme. The other sample was a set of extended pedigrees selected for apparent autosomal dominant transmission of DRD. We failed to find an association between DRD and ID in either sample, regardless of the method used to assess immune system function. Even though our twin sample provided evidence that both DRD and immune conditions were significantly heritable, there was no evidence for a genetic correlation between ID and DRD nor was there any clear indication that a special subgroup of individuals may be comorbid for these conditions because of genetic reasons. How these negative findings can be reconciled with the developmental hypothesis of Geschwind, Behan, Galaburda, and colleagues, and how they may relate to the gene locus influencing DRD that has been recently located in the HLA region of the short aim of chromosome 6 is discussed.

AB - We conducted a study of the association between developmental reading disability (DRD) and immune disorders (ID) using both survey and immunoassay data in tWO separate samples of families. One sample was made up of twins and their parents and was ascertained through a population-based sampling scheme. The other sample was a set of extended pedigrees selected for apparent autosomal dominant transmission of DRD. We failed to find an association between DRD and ID in either sample, regardless of the method used to assess immune system function. Even though our twin sample provided evidence that both DRD and immune conditions were significantly heritable, there was no evidence for a genetic correlation between ID and DRD nor was there any clear indication that a special subgroup of individuals may be comorbid for these conditions because of genetic reasons. How these negative findings can be reconciled with the developmental hypothesis of Geschwind, Behan, Galaburda, and colleagues, and how they may relate to the gene locus influencing DRD that has been recently located in the HLA region of the short aim of chromosome 6 is discussed.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0031812486&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0031812486&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1006/brcg.1997.0972

DO - 10.1006/brcg.1997.0972

M3 - Article

C2 - 9647681

AN - SCOPUS:0031812486

VL - 36

SP - 310

EP - 333

JO - Brain and Cognition

JF - Brain and Cognition

SN - 0278-2626

IS - 3

ER -