A treatment for vocal cord dysfunction in female athletes: An outcome study

Marsha D. Sullivan, Barbara M. Heywood, David R. Beukelman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

106 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: This article reports the outcome of a speech pathology treatment program for vocal cord dysfunction (VCD) in 20 adolescent female athletes. Study Design: A retrospective, nonrandomized group design was used to collect the outcome data. Methods: Twenty consecutive referrals of female athletes diagnosed as having symptoms of VCD during exercise were assessed, treated, and followed for at least 6 months after treatment. Results: Ninety-five percent of the participants reported the ability to control symptoms of VCD during exercise up to 6 months after treatment. Asthma medications were no longer used by 80% of the athletes. All of the females continued to participate in athletics. Conclusion: Speech pathology intervention focusing on respiratory control of VCD in adolescent female athletes is an effective treatment resulting in the athletes' ability to control the symptoms of VCD in exercise for at least 6 months after treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1751-1755
Number of pages5
JournalLaryngoscope
Volume111
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2001

Fingerprint

Vocal Cord Dysfunction
Athletes
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Speech-Language Pathology
Exercise
Therapeutics
Sports
Referral and Consultation
Asthma

Keywords

  • Exercise-induced asthma
  • Speech pathology
  • Vocal cord dysfunction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

A treatment for vocal cord dysfunction in female athletes : An outcome study. / Sullivan, Marsha D.; Heywood, Barbara M.; Beukelman, David R.

In: Laryngoscope, Vol. 111, No. 10, 01.01.2001, p. 1751-1755.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sullivan, Marsha D. ; Heywood, Barbara M. ; Beukelman, David R. / A treatment for vocal cord dysfunction in female athletes : An outcome study. In: Laryngoscope. 2001 ; Vol. 111, No. 10. pp. 1751-1755.
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