Abstract

Background Applications of plasma-derived human fibrin sealants (pdhFS) have been limited because of cost, limited supply of pathogen-screened plasma, the need for bioengineering improvements, and regulatory issues associated with federal approval. We describe a totally recombinant human fibrin sealant (rhFS), which may engender an abundant, safe, and cost-effective supply of efficacious fibrin sealant. Materials and methods A first-generation rhFS made from recombinant human fibrinogen (rhFI; produced in the milk of transgenic cows), activated recombinant human factor XIII (rhFXIIIa; produced in yeast), and recombinant human thrombin (rhFIIa; purchased, made in animal cell culture) was formulated using thromboelastography (TEG). The hemostatic efficacy of rhFS versus commercial pdhFS was compared in a nonlethal porcine hepatic wedge excision model. Results The maximal clot strength of rhFS measured in vitro by TEG was not statistically different than that of pdhFS. TEG analysis also showed that the rhFS gained strength more quickly as reflected by a steeper α angle; however, the rhFS achieved this clot strength with a 5-fold lower factor I content than the pdhFS. When these fibrin sealants were studied in a porcine hepatic wedge excision model, the hemostatic scores of the rhFS were equivalent or better than that of the pdhFS. Conclusions The bioengineered rhFS had equivalent or better hemostatic efficacy than the pdhFS in a nonlethal hemorrhage model, despite the factor I concentration in the rhFS being about one-fifth that in the pdhFS. Because the rhFS is amenable to large-scale production, the rhFS has the potential to be more economical and abundant than the pdhFS, while having a decreased risk of blood-borne pathogen transmission.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)334-342
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Surgical Research
Volume187
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 1 2014

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Keywords

  • Factor XIII
  • Fibrin sealant
  • Fibrinogen
  • Hemorrhage
  • Hemostasis
  • Human
  • Recombinant
  • Swine
  • Thrombin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

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