A theory of responsive design: A field study of corporate engagement with open source communities

Matt Germonprez, Julie E. Kendall, Kenneth E. Kendall, Lars Mathiassen, Brett Young, Brian Warner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although our general knowledge about open source communities is extensive, we are only beginning to understand the increasingly common practices by which corporations design software through engagement with these communities. In response, we combine design theorizing with field-study research (1) to analyze rich qualitative data from over 40 corporations participating in the Linux open source community and (2) to synthesize the observed corporate-open source community engagements into a new type of information systems design theory that we call responsive design. Empirically, we document how corporate participants in these contexts respond to market decisions, interdependent ideologies, and distributed relationships by continuously establishing and maintaining connections with community members; connections that stem from the social and material rules inherent in the open source community. Based on these observations, we create the theory of responsive design as a particular form of corporate software design which, beyond the inclusion of external participants, distinguishes itself from traditional monocentric design in which one corporation controls a dedicated team of software designers focused on solving an isolated and singular organizational problem. Guided by the principles of interconnection, opportunism, and domestication, we define responsive design as the kind of design approach that enables corporate participants to create and maintain productive design practices in response to the complex and dynamic landscapes of activities that are the foundation of corporate-communal engagements. We conclude with a discussion of the theoretical and practical implications of this newformof corporate software design.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)64-83
Number of pages20
JournalInformation Systems Research
Volume28
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2017

Fingerprint

field of study
Software design
community
corporation
opportunism
Industry
interconnection
Ideologies
Open source
Field study
information system
inclusion
Information systems
Systems analysis
software
market

Keywords

  • Corporations
  • Design theory
  • Engaged scholarship
  • Field study
  • Open source communities
  • Open source software
  • Responsive design
  • Thematic analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Management Information Systems
  • Information Systems
  • Computer Networks and Communications
  • Information Systems and Management
  • Library and Information Sciences

Cite this

A theory of responsive design : A field study of corporate engagement with open source communities. / Germonprez, Matt; Kendall, Julie E.; Kendall, Kenneth E.; Mathiassen, Lars; Young, Brett; Warner, Brian.

In: Information Systems Research, Vol. 28, No. 1, 01.03.2017, p. 64-83.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Germonprez, Matt ; Kendall, Julie E. ; Kendall, Kenneth E. ; Mathiassen, Lars ; Young, Brett ; Warner, Brian. / A theory of responsive design : A field study of corporate engagement with open source communities. In: Information Systems Research. 2017 ; Vol. 28, No. 1. pp. 64-83.
@article{cf1389bd578a463cac4d43f9dd9aacab,
title = "A theory of responsive design: A field study of corporate engagement with open source communities",
abstract = "Although our general knowledge about open source communities is extensive, we are only beginning to understand the increasingly common practices by which corporations design software through engagement with these communities. In response, we combine design theorizing with field-study research (1) to analyze rich qualitative data from over 40 corporations participating in the Linux open source community and (2) to synthesize the observed corporate-open source community engagements into a new type of information systems design theory that we call responsive design. Empirically, we document how corporate participants in these contexts respond to market decisions, interdependent ideologies, and distributed relationships by continuously establishing and maintaining connections with community members; connections that stem from the social and material rules inherent in the open source community. Based on these observations, we create the theory of responsive design as a particular form of corporate software design which, beyond the inclusion of external participants, distinguishes itself from traditional monocentric design in which one corporation controls a dedicated team of software designers focused on solving an isolated and singular organizational problem. Guided by the principles of interconnection, opportunism, and domestication, we define responsive design as the kind of design approach that enables corporate participants to create and maintain productive design practices in response to the complex and dynamic landscapes of activities that are the foundation of corporate-communal engagements. We conclude with a discussion of the theoretical and practical implications of this newformof corporate software design.",
keywords = "Corporations, Design theory, Engaged scholarship, Field study, Open source communities, Open source software, Responsive design, Thematic analysis",
author = "Matt Germonprez and Kendall, {Julie E.} and Kendall, {Kenneth E.} and Lars Mathiassen and Brett Young and Brian Warner",
year = "2017",
month = "3",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1287/isre.2016.0662",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "28",
pages = "64--83",
journal = "Information Systems Research",
issn = "1047-7047",
publisher = "INFORMS Inst.for Operations Res.and the Management Sciences",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - A theory of responsive design

T2 - A field study of corporate engagement with open source communities

AU - Germonprez, Matt

AU - Kendall, Julie E.

AU - Kendall, Kenneth E.

AU - Mathiassen, Lars

AU - Young, Brett

AU - Warner, Brian

PY - 2017/3/1

Y1 - 2017/3/1

N2 - Although our general knowledge about open source communities is extensive, we are only beginning to understand the increasingly common practices by which corporations design software through engagement with these communities. In response, we combine design theorizing with field-study research (1) to analyze rich qualitative data from over 40 corporations participating in the Linux open source community and (2) to synthesize the observed corporate-open source community engagements into a new type of information systems design theory that we call responsive design. Empirically, we document how corporate participants in these contexts respond to market decisions, interdependent ideologies, and distributed relationships by continuously establishing and maintaining connections with community members; connections that stem from the social and material rules inherent in the open source community. Based on these observations, we create the theory of responsive design as a particular form of corporate software design which, beyond the inclusion of external participants, distinguishes itself from traditional monocentric design in which one corporation controls a dedicated team of software designers focused on solving an isolated and singular organizational problem. Guided by the principles of interconnection, opportunism, and domestication, we define responsive design as the kind of design approach that enables corporate participants to create and maintain productive design practices in response to the complex and dynamic landscapes of activities that are the foundation of corporate-communal engagements. We conclude with a discussion of the theoretical and practical implications of this newformof corporate software design.

AB - Although our general knowledge about open source communities is extensive, we are only beginning to understand the increasingly common practices by which corporations design software through engagement with these communities. In response, we combine design theorizing with field-study research (1) to analyze rich qualitative data from over 40 corporations participating in the Linux open source community and (2) to synthesize the observed corporate-open source community engagements into a new type of information systems design theory that we call responsive design. Empirically, we document how corporate participants in these contexts respond to market decisions, interdependent ideologies, and distributed relationships by continuously establishing and maintaining connections with community members; connections that stem from the social and material rules inherent in the open source community. Based on these observations, we create the theory of responsive design as a particular form of corporate software design which, beyond the inclusion of external participants, distinguishes itself from traditional monocentric design in which one corporation controls a dedicated team of software designers focused on solving an isolated and singular organizational problem. Guided by the principles of interconnection, opportunism, and domestication, we define responsive design as the kind of design approach that enables corporate participants to create and maintain productive design practices in response to the complex and dynamic landscapes of activities that are the foundation of corporate-communal engagements. We conclude with a discussion of the theoretical and practical implications of this newformof corporate software design.

KW - Corporations

KW - Design theory

KW - Engaged scholarship

KW - Field study

KW - Open source communities

KW - Open source software

KW - Responsive design

KW - Thematic analysis

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85016187972&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85016187972&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1287/isre.2016.0662

DO - 10.1287/isre.2016.0662

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85016187972

VL - 28

SP - 64

EP - 83

JO - Information Systems Research

JF - Information Systems Research

SN - 1047-7047

IS - 1

ER -