A registry study of the association of patient's residence and age with colorectal cancer survival

Jayashri Sankaranarayanan, Fang Qiu, Shinobu Watanabe-Galloway

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Because of limited literature from rural states of the United States like Nebraska, we evaluated the association of patient's age, Office of Management and Budget residence-county categories (rural-nonmetro, micropolitan-nonmetro, urban), and significant interactions between confounding-variables with colorectal cancer (CRC) survival. This retrospective 1998-2003 study of 6561 CRC patients from the Nebraska Cancer Registry showed median patient survival in colon and rectal cancer in urban, rural and micropolitan counties were 33, 36, and 46 months and 41, 47, 49 months, respectively. In Cox proportional-hazards analyses, after adjusting for significant demographics (age, race, marital status in colon cancer; age, insurance status in rectal cancer), cancer stage, surgery and radiation treatments; 1) no-chemotherapy urban colon cancer patients had significantly shorter survival (rural vs urban; adjusted hazard ratio, HR: 0.78 or urban vs rural HR: 1.28; micropolitan vs urban, HR: 0.78) and 2) no-surgery urban (vs rural, HR: 1.49); micropolitan (vs rural, HR: 2.01) rectal cancer patients had significantly shorter survival. Colon cancer (≥65 years) and rectal cancer (≥75 years) elderly each versus patients aged 19-64 years old had significantly shorter survival (all p < 0.01). The association of patients' age and treatment/residence-county interactions with CRC survival warrant decision-makers' attention.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)301-313
Number of pages13
JournalExpert Review of Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research
Volume14
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2014

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Registries
Colorectal Neoplasms
Rectal Neoplasms
Survival
Colonic Neoplasms
Office Management
Insurance Coverage
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Marital Status
Budgets
Neoplasms
Demography
Radiation
Drug Therapy
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Colorectal-cancer
  • Micropolitan
  • Nebraska cancer registry
  • Office of Management and Budget coded residence-county
  • Rural
  • Survival
  • Urban

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

A registry study of the association of patient's residence and age with colorectal cancer survival. / Sankaranarayanan, Jayashri; Qiu, Fang; Watanabe-Galloway, Shinobu.

In: Expert Review of Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research, Vol. 14, No. 2, 04.2014, p. 301-313.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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