A protein encoded by the bovine herpesvirus 1 open reading frame E gene induces neurite-like morphological changes in mouse neorublastoma cells and is expressed in trigeminal ganglionic neurons

Sandra Perez, Florencia Meyer, Gail Henderson, Yunquan Jiang, Simon Sherman, Alan R Doster, Melissa Inman, Clinton Jones

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Bovine herpes virus 1 (BHV-1), like other α-herpesvirinae subfamily members, establishes latency in sensory neurons. Periodically BHV-1 reactivates from latency, resulting in virus shedding and spread to uninfected cattle. Although reactivation from latency does not usually lead to recurrent disease, the latency-reactivation cycle is crucial for virus transmission. The latency-related (LR) RNA is abundantly expressed during latency, and expression of a LR encoded protein is necessary for dexamethasone-induced reactivation from latency in cattle. Within LR promoter sequences, a small open reading frame (ORF) was identified (ORF-E) that is antisense to the LR-RNA, and downstream of the bICP0 gene. ORF-E transcription is consistently detected in trigeminal ganglia (TG) of latently infected calves, suggesting ORF-E expression plays a role in the latency-reactivation cycle. Polyclonal antiserum directed against an ORF-E peptide or the entire ORF-E protein specifically recognizes the nucleus of sensory neurons in TG of latently infected calves. The ORF-E peptide-specific antiserum also recognizes a protein when mouse neuroblastoma cells (neuro-2A) are transfected with an ORF-E expression construct. In contrast to the growth inhibiting properties of the LR gene, stably transfected ORF-E-expressing cells were obtained. Neuro-2A cells stably transfected with a plasmid expressing ORF-E induced morphological changes that resembled neurite-like projections. In contrast, neurite-like projections were not observed following transfection of neuro-2A cells with an empty vector. These studies suggest that a protein encoded by ORF-E has the potential to alter the physiology or metabolism of neuronal cell types, which may be important for long-term latency.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)139-149
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of neurovirology
Volume13
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2007

Fingerprint

Bovine Herpesvirus 1
Neurites
Open Reading Frames
Neurons
Genes
Proteins
Trigeminal Ganglion
Sensory Receptor Cells
Viruses
Immune Sera
RNA
Virus Shedding
Neuroblastoma
Dexamethasone
Transfection
Plasmids

Keywords

  • Bovine herpesvirus type 1
  • Latency
  • Neurite outgrowth
  • ORF-E

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
  • Virology

Cite this

A protein encoded by the bovine herpesvirus 1 open reading frame E gene induces neurite-like morphological changes in mouse neorublastoma cells and is expressed in trigeminal ganglionic neurons. / Perez, Sandra; Meyer, Florencia; Henderson, Gail; Jiang, Yunquan; Sherman, Simon; Doster, Alan R; Inman, Melissa; Jones, Clinton.

In: Journal of neurovirology, Vol. 13, No. 2, 01.03.2007, p. 139-149.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Bovine herpes virus 1 (BHV-1), like other α-herpesvirinae subfamily members, establishes latency in sensory neurons. Periodically BHV-1 reactivates from latency, resulting in virus shedding and spread to uninfected cattle. Although reactivation from latency does not usually lead to recurrent disease, the latency-reactivation cycle is crucial for virus transmission. The latency-related (LR) RNA is abundantly expressed during latency, and expression of a LR encoded protein is necessary for dexamethasone-induced reactivation from latency in cattle. Within LR promoter sequences, a small open reading frame (ORF) was identified (ORF-E) that is antisense to the LR-RNA, and downstream of the bICP0 gene. ORF-E transcription is consistently detected in trigeminal ganglia (TG) of latently infected calves, suggesting ORF-E expression plays a role in the latency-reactivation cycle. Polyclonal antiserum directed against an ORF-E peptide or the entire ORF-E protein specifically recognizes the nucleus of sensory neurons in TG of latently infected calves. The ORF-E peptide-specific antiserum also recognizes a protein when mouse neuroblastoma cells (neuro-2A) are transfected with an ORF-E expression construct. In contrast to the growth inhibiting properties of the LR gene, stably transfected ORF-E-expressing cells were obtained. Neuro-2A cells stably transfected with a plasmid expressing ORF-E induced morphological changes that resembled neurite-like projections. In contrast, neurite-like projections were not observed following transfection of neuro-2A cells with an empty vector. These studies suggest that a protein encoded by ORF-E has the potential to alter the physiology or metabolism of neuronal cell types, which may be important for long-term latency.",
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