A practical approach to phylogenomics: The phylogeny of ray-finned fish (Actinopterygii) as a case study

Chenhong Li, Guillermo Ortí, Gong Zhang, Guoqing Lu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

254 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. Molecular systematics occupies one of the central stages in biology in the genomic era, ushered in by unprecedented progress in DNA technology. The inference of organismal phylogeny is now based on many independent genetic loci, a widely accepted approach to assemble the tree of life. Surprisingly, this approach is hindered by lack of appropriate nuclear gene markers for many taxonomic groups especially at high taxonomic level, partially due to the lack of tools for efficiently developing new phylogenetic makers. We report here a genome-comparison strategy to identifying nuclear gene markers for phylogenetic inference and apply it to the ray-finned fishes - the largest vertebrate clade in need of phylogenetic resolution. Results. A total of 154 candidate molecular markers - relatively well conserved, putatively single-copy gene fragments with long, uninterrupted exons - were obtained by comparing whole genome sequences of two model organisms, Danio rerio and Takifugu rubripes. Experimental tests of 15 of these (randomly picked) markers on 36 taxa (representing two-thirds of the ray-finned fish orders) demonstrate the feasibility of amplifying by PCR and directly sequencing most of these candidates from whole genomic DNA in a vast diversity of fish species. Preliminary phylogenetic analyses of sequence data obtained for 14 taxa and 10 markers (total of 7,872 bp for each species) are encouraging, suggesting that the markers obtained will make significant contributions to future fish phylogenetic studies. Conclusion. We present a practical approach that systematically compares whole genome sequences to identify single-copy nuclear gene markers for inferring phylogeny. Our method is an improvement over traditional approaches (e.g., manually picking genes for testing) because it uses genomic information and automates the process to identify large numbers of candidate makers. This approach is shown here to be successful for fishes, but also could be applied to other groups of organisms for which two or more complete genome sequences exist, which has important implications for assembling the tree of life.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number44
JournalBMC Evolutionary Biology
Volume7
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2 2007

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Skates (Fish)
Actinopterygii
Phylogeny
phylogeny
case studies
Genome
fish
Fishes
phylogenetics
Genes
genome
gene
genomics
genetic markers
Takifugu
Genetic Loci
DNA
Zebrafish
Takifugu rubripes
Sequence Analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics

Cite this

A practical approach to phylogenomics : The phylogeny of ray-finned fish (Actinopterygii) as a case study. / Li, Chenhong; Ortí, Guillermo; Zhang, Gong; Lu, Guoqing.

In: BMC Evolutionary Biology, Vol. 7, 44, 02.04.2007.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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