A plant virus vector for systemic expression of foreign genes in cereals

Il Ryong Choi, Drake C. Stenger, T. Jack Morris, Roy French

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

66 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Inserts bearing the coding sequences of NPTII and β-glucuronidase (GUS) were placed between the nuclear inclusion b (NIb) and coat protein (CP) domains of the wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) polyprotein ORF. The WSMV NIb-CP junction containing the nuclear inclusion a (NIa) protease cleavage site was duplicated, permitting excision of foreign protein domains from the viral polyprotein. Wheat, barley, oat and maize seedlings supported systemic infection of WSMV bearing NPT II. The NPT II insert was stable for at least 18-30 days post-inoculation and had little effect on WSMV CP accumulation. Histochemical assays indicated the presence of functional GUS protein in systemically infected wheat and barley plants inoculated with WSMV bearing GUS. The GUS constructs had greatly reduced virulence on both oat and maize. RT-PCR indicated that the GUS insert was subject to deletion, particularly when expressed as a GUS-NIb protein fusion. Both reporter genes were expressed in wheat roots at levels comparable to those observed in leaves. These results clearly demonstrate the utility of WSMV as a transient gene expression vector for grass species, including two important grain crops, wheat and maize. The results further indicate that both host species and the nature of inserted sequences affect the stability and expression of foreign genes delivered by engineered virus genomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)547-555
Number of pages9
JournalPlant Journal
Volume23
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 12 2000

Fingerprint

Wheat streak mosaic virus
Plant Viruses
plant viruses
nuclear inclusions
Triticum
Mosaic Viruses
Glucuronidase
Gene Expression
Intranuclear Inclusion Bodies
coat proteins
wheat
genes
Capsid Proteins
corn
oats
Zea mays
Polyproteins
barley
Hordeum
proteins

Keywords

  • Cereals
  • Monocotyledonous plants
  • Virus gene expression vector

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • Plant Science
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

A plant virus vector for systemic expression of foreign genes in cereals. / Choi, Il Ryong; Stenger, Drake C.; Jack Morris, T.; French, Roy.

In: Plant Journal, Vol. 23, No. 4, 12.09.2000, p. 547-555.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Choi, IR, Stenger, DC, Jack Morris, T & French, R 2000, 'A plant virus vector for systemic expression of foreign genes in cereals', Plant Journal, vol. 23, no. 4, pp. 547-555. https://doi.org/10.1046/j.1365-313X.2000.00820.x
Choi, Il Ryong ; Stenger, Drake C. ; Jack Morris, T. ; French, Roy. / A plant virus vector for systemic expression of foreign genes in cereals. In: Plant Journal. 2000 ; Vol. 23, No. 4. pp. 547-555.
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