A novel method to recover ammonia, manganese and sulfate from electrolytic manganese residues by bio-leaching

Jirong Lan, Yan Sun, Li Guo, Zhuoman Li, Dongyun Du, Tian C. Zhang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The electrolytic manganese residues (EMRs) contain variable amounts of trace metals and valuable elements, which can negatively impact the environment. This research focused on recovering valuable elements (SO 4 2− , NH 3 –N, Mn, Mg, and Fe) from EMRs by bioleaching. Bacteria (Y1) were isolated from EMRs and then acclimated for bioleaching processes. The bacteria can grow with waste molasses as the only carbon/nutrient source. After bioleaching for 8 days, 78–88%, 85–98%, 75–85%, 88–95%, and 95–99% of SO 4 2− , Mn, Mg, Fe, and NH 3 –N were leached out from EMRs with a solid-to-liquid ratio of 1:2.5 kg of EMR powder L −1 of leaching liquid. Then, the elements of NH 3 –N, Mn, Mg, and Fe were separately precipitated as (NH 4 ) 2 Mn(SO 4 ) 2 6H 2 O, (NH 4 ) 2 Mg(SO 4 ) 2 6H 2 O and (NH 4 ) Fe(SO 4 ) 2 6H 2 O by adjusting the pH of the bioleachate (i.e., the filtrate of the leachate solution) to 8.5–9.0. The process could be cost-effective due to the use of waste molasses (a low-cost product from sugar processes) as carbon sources and may have a great potential for industrial applications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)499-507
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Cleaner Production
Volume223
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 20 2019

Fingerprint

Leaching
Manganese
Ammonia
manganese
Bioleaching
ammonia
leaching
sulfate
Molasses
Bacteria
bacterium
liquid
Carbon
carbon
Liquids
Sugar (sucrose)
cost
Nutrients
Industrial applications
trace metal

Keywords

  • Bioleaching
  • Electrolytic manganese residues
  • Recovery of heavy metals
  • Resource recovery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Renewable Energy, Sustainability and the Environment
  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Strategy and Management
  • Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering

Cite this

A novel method to recover ammonia, manganese and sulfate from electrolytic manganese residues by bio-leaching. / Lan, Jirong; Sun, Yan; Guo, Li; Li, Zhuoman; Du, Dongyun; Zhang, Tian C.

In: Journal of Cleaner Production, Vol. 223, 20.06.2019, p. 499-507.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "The electrolytic manganese residues (EMRs) contain variable amounts of trace metals and valuable elements, which can negatively impact the environment. This research focused on recovering valuable elements (SO 4 2− , NH 3 –N, Mn, Mg, and Fe) from EMRs by bioleaching. Bacteria (Y1) were isolated from EMRs and then acclimated for bioleaching processes. The bacteria can grow with waste molasses as the only carbon/nutrient source. After bioleaching for 8 days, 78–88{\%}, 85–98{\%}, 75–85{\%}, 88–95{\%}, and 95–99{\%} of SO 4 2− , Mn, Mg, Fe, and NH 3 –N were leached out from EMRs with a solid-to-liquid ratio of 1:2.5 kg of EMR powder L −1 of leaching liquid. Then, the elements of NH 3 –N, Mn, Mg, and Fe were separately precipitated as (NH 4 ) 2 Mn(SO 4 ) 2 6H 2 O, (NH 4 ) 2 Mg(SO 4 ) 2 6H 2 O and (NH 4 ) Fe(SO 4 ) 2 6H 2 O by adjusting the pH of the bioleachate (i.e., the filtrate of the leachate solution) to 8.5–9.0. The process could be cost-effective due to the use of waste molasses (a low-cost product from sugar processes) as carbon sources and may have a great potential for industrial applications.",
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AB - The electrolytic manganese residues (EMRs) contain variable amounts of trace metals and valuable elements, which can negatively impact the environment. This research focused on recovering valuable elements (SO 4 2− , NH 3 –N, Mn, Mg, and Fe) from EMRs by bioleaching. Bacteria (Y1) were isolated from EMRs and then acclimated for bioleaching processes. The bacteria can grow with waste molasses as the only carbon/nutrient source. After bioleaching for 8 days, 78–88%, 85–98%, 75–85%, 88–95%, and 95–99% of SO 4 2− , Mn, Mg, Fe, and NH 3 –N were leached out from EMRs with a solid-to-liquid ratio of 1:2.5 kg of EMR powder L −1 of leaching liquid. Then, the elements of NH 3 –N, Mn, Mg, and Fe were separately precipitated as (NH 4 ) 2 Mn(SO 4 ) 2 6H 2 O, (NH 4 ) 2 Mg(SO 4 ) 2 6H 2 O and (NH 4 ) Fe(SO 4 ) 2 6H 2 O by adjusting the pH of the bioleachate (i.e., the filtrate of the leachate solution) to 8.5–9.0. The process could be cost-effective due to the use of waste molasses (a low-cost product from sugar processes) as carbon sources and may have a great potential for industrial applications.

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