A New Mouse Model for the Study of Human Breast Cancer Metastasis

Elizabeth Iorns, Katherine Drews-Elger, Toby M. Ward, Sonja Dean, Jennifer Clarke, Deborah Berry, Dorraya El Ashry, Marc Lippman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

69 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women, and this prevalence has a major impact on health worldwide. Localized breast cancer has an excellent prognosis, with a 5-year relative survival rate of 85%. However, the survival rate drops to only 23% for women with distant metastases. To date, the study of breast cancer metastasis has been hampered by a lack of reliable metastatic models. Here we describe a novel in vivo model using human breast cancer xenografts in NOD scid gamma (NSG) mice; in this model human breast cancer cells reliably metastasize to distant organs from primary tumors grown within the mammary fat pad. This model enables the study of the entire metastatic process from the proper anatomical site, providing an important new approach to examine the mechanisms underlying breast cancer metastasis. We used this model to identify gene expression changes that occur at metastatic sites relative to the primary mammary fat pad tumor. By comparing multiple metastatic sites and independent cell lines, we have identified several gene expression changes that may be important for tumor growth at distant sites.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere47995
JournalPloS one
Volume7
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 31 2012

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metastasis
breast neoplasms
animal models
Breast Neoplasms
Neoplasm Metastasis
Tumors
neoplasms
Gene expression
breasts
Fats
Cells
Adipose Tissue
Neoplasms
Breast
Survival Rate
survival rate
Gene Expression
gene expression
Heterografts
lipids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • General

Cite this

Iorns, E., Drews-Elger, K., Ward, T. M., Dean, S., Clarke, J., Berry, D., ... Lippman, M. (2012). A New Mouse Model for the Study of Human Breast Cancer Metastasis. PloS one, 7(10), [e47995]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0047995

A New Mouse Model for the Study of Human Breast Cancer Metastasis. / Iorns, Elizabeth; Drews-Elger, Katherine; Ward, Toby M.; Dean, Sonja; Clarke, Jennifer; Berry, Deborah; Ashry, Dorraya El; Lippman, Marc.

In: PloS one, Vol. 7, No. 10, e47995, 31.10.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Iorns, E, Drews-Elger, K, Ward, TM, Dean, S, Clarke, J, Berry, D, Ashry, DE & Lippman, M 2012, 'A New Mouse Model for the Study of Human Breast Cancer Metastasis', PloS one, vol. 7, no. 10, e47995. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0047995
Iorns E, Drews-Elger K, Ward TM, Dean S, Clarke J, Berry D et al. A New Mouse Model for the Study of Human Breast Cancer Metastasis. PloS one. 2012 Oct 31;7(10). e47995. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0047995
Iorns, Elizabeth ; Drews-Elger, Katherine ; Ward, Toby M. ; Dean, Sonja ; Clarke, Jennifer ; Berry, Deborah ; Ashry, Dorraya El ; Lippman, Marc. / A New Mouse Model for the Study of Human Breast Cancer Metastasis. In: PloS one. 2012 ; Vol. 7, No. 10.
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