A mortality cost of virginity at older ages in female Mediterranean fruit flies

James R. Carey, Pablo Liedo, Lawrence G Harshman, Ying Zhang, Hans Georg Müller, Linda Partridge, Jane Ling Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Mortality rates were measured over the lifetime of 65,000 female Mediterranean fruit flies, Ceratitis capitata, maintained in either all-female (virgin) cages or cages with equal initial numbers of males, to determine the effect of sexual activity and mating on the mortality trajectory of females at older ages. Although a greater fraction of females maintained in all-female (virgin) cages survived to older ages, the life expectancy of the surviving virgins was less than the life expectancy of surviving non-virgins at older ages. This was due to a mortality crossover where virgin flies experience lower mortality than mated flies from eclosion to Day 20 but higher mortality thereafter. These results suggest that there are two consequences of mating - a short-term mortality increase (cost) and a longer term mortality decrease (benefit).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)507-512
Number of pages6
JournalExperimental Gerontology
Volume37
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 12 2002

Fingerprint

Ceratitis capitata
Sexual Abstinence
Fruits
Trajectories
Costs and Cost Analysis
Mortality
Costs
Life Expectancy
Diptera
Sexual Behavior

Keywords

  • Age-specific mortality
  • Ceratitis capitata
  • Cost of mating
  • Cost of reproduction
  • Life tables
  • Mediterranean fruit fly

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Aging
  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics
  • Endocrinology
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Carey, J. R., Liedo, P., Harshman, L. G., Zhang, Y., Müller, H. G., Partridge, L., & Wang, J. L. (2002). A mortality cost of virginity at older ages in female Mediterranean fruit flies. Experimental Gerontology, 37(4), 507-512. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0531-5565(01)00230-3

A mortality cost of virginity at older ages in female Mediterranean fruit flies. / Carey, James R.; Liedo, Pablo; Harshman, Lawrence G; Zhang, Ying; Müller, Hans Georg; Partridge, Linda; Wang, Jane Ling.

In: Experimental Gerontology, Vol. 37, No. 4, 12.02.2002, p. 507-512.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Carey, JR, Liedo, P, Harshman, LG, Zhang, Y, Müller, HG, Partridge, L & Wang, JL 2002, 'A mortality cost of virginity at older ages in female Mediterranean fruit flies', Experimental Gerontology, vol. 37, no. 4, pp. 507-512. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0531-5565(01)00230-3
Carey JR, Liedo P, Harshman LG, Zhang Y, Müller HG, Partridge L et al. A mortality cost of virginity at older ages in female Mediterranean fruit flies. Experimental Gerontology. 2002 Feb 12;37(4):507-512. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0531-5565(01)00230-3
Carey, James R. ; Liedo, Pablo ; Harshman, Lawrence G ; Zhang, Ying ; Müller, Hans Georg ; Partridge, Linda ; Wang, Jane Ling. / A mortality cost of virginity at older ages in female Mediterranean fruit flies. In: Experimental Gerontology. 2002 ; Vol. 37, No. 4. pp. 507-512.
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