A mechanomyographic fatigue threshold test for cycling

J. M. Zuniga, T. J. Housh, C. L. Camic, C. R. Hendrix, R. J. Schmidt, M. Mielke, G. O. Johnson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purposes of this study were twofold: 1) to derive the mechanomyographic mean power frequency fatigue threshold (MMG MPFFT) for submaximal cycle ergometry; and 2) to compare the power outputs associated to the MMG MPFFT to other neuromuscular and gas exchange fatigue thresholds. 9 adults (5 men and 4 women; mean±SD age=23.7±3.7 years; body weight=66.3±8.2kg) performed an incremental cycle ergometry test to exhaustion while expired gas samples, electromyographic (EMG), and MMG signals were measured from the vastus lateralis muscle. The non-significant correlations (r=0.17 to 0.66; p>0.05) among the physical working capacity at the fatigue threshold (PWCFT), MMG MPFFT, and gas exchange threshold (GET) suggested that different physiological mechanisms may underlie these 3 fatigue thresholds. A significant correlation (r=0.83) for the MPFFT vs. respiratory compensation point (RCP) suggested that these fatigue thresholds may be mediated by a common physiological mechanism. In addition, the significantly lower mean values found for the PWCFT (mean±SD=163±43 W), MMG MPFFT (132±33 W), and GET (144±28 W) than MPFFT (196±53 W) and RCP (202±41 W) suggested that these gas exchange and neuromuscular fatigue thresholds may demarcate different exercise intensity domains.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)636-643
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Journal of Sports Medicine
Volume31
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 10 2010

Fingerprint

Fatigue
Gases
Ergometry
Quadriceps Muscle
Body Weight
Exercise
Muscles

Keywords

  • exercise intensity domains
  • frequency-based test
  • mechanomyography
  • pedaling exercise

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Zuniga, J. M., Housh, T. J., Camic, C. L., Hendrix, C. R., Schmidt, R. J., Mielke, M., & Johnson, G. O. (2010). A mechanomyographic fatigue threshold test for cycling. International Journal of Sports Medicine, 31(9), 636-643. https://doi.org/10.1055/s-0030-1255112

A mechanomyographic fatigue threshold test for cycling. / Zuniga, J. M.; Housh, T. J.; Camic, C. L.; Hendrix, C. R.; Schmidt, R. J.; Mielke, M.; Johnson, G. O.

In: International Journal of Sports Medicine, Vol. 31, No. 9, 10.09.2010, p. 636-643.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zuniga, JM, Housh, TJ, Camic, CL, Hendrix, CR, Schmidt, RJ, Mielke, M & Johnson, GO 2010, 'A mechanomyographic fatigue threshold test for cycling', International Journal of Sports Medicine, vol. 31, no. 9, pp. 636-643. https://doi.org/10.1055/s-0030-1255112
Zuniga, J. M. ; Housh, T. J. ; Camic, C. L. ; Hendrix, C. R. ; Schmidt, R. J. ; Mielke, M. ; Johnson, G. O. / A mechanomyographic fatigue threshold test for cycling. In: International Journal of Sports Medicine. 2010 ; Vol. 31, No. 9. pp. 636-643.
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