A longitudinal, within-person investigation of the association between the P3 ERP component and externalizing behavior problems in young children

Isaac T. Petersen, Caroline P. Hoyniak, John E. Bates, Angela D. Staples, Dennis L Molfese

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Externalizing problems, including aggression and conduct problems, are thought to involve impaired attentional capacities. Previous research suggests that the P3 event-related potential (ERP) component is an index of attentional processing, and diminished P3 amplitudes to infrequent stimuli have been shown to be associated with externalizing problems and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). However, the vast majority of this prior work has been cross-sectional and has not examined young children. The present study is the first investigation of whether within-individual changes in P3 amplitude predict changes in externalizing problems, providing a stronger test of developmental process. Method: Participants included a community sample of children (N = 153) followed longitudinally at 30, 36, and 42 months of age. Children completed an oddball task while ERP data were recorded. Parents rated their children's aggression and ADHD symptoms. Results: Children's within-individual changes in the P3 amplitude predicted concomitant within-child changes in their aggression such that smaller P3 amplitudes (relative to a child's own mean) were associated with more aggression symptoms. However, changes in P3 amplitudes were not significantly associated with ADHD symptoms. Conclusions: Findings suggest that the P3 may play a role in development of aggression, but do not support the notion that the P3 plays a role in development of early ADHD symptoms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1044-1051
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied Disciplines
Volume59
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2018

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P300 Event-Related Potentials
Aggression
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity
Problem Behavior
Evoked Potentials
Parents
Research

Keywords

  • aggression
  • attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder
  • early childhood
  • externalizing behavior problems
  • P3 ERP

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

A longitudinal, within-person investigation of the association between the P3 ERP component and externalizing behavior problems in young children. / Petersen, Isaac T.; Hoyniak, Caroline P.; Bates, John E.; Staples, Angela D.; Molfese, Dennis L.

In: Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied Disciplines, Vol. 59, No. 10, 01.10.2018, p. 1044-1051.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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