A Longitudinal Investigation of Stress Spillover in Marriage: Does Spousal Support Adequacy Buffer the Effects?

Rebecca L. Brock, Erika Lawrence

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

46 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Stress spillover in marriage was examined within a stress-buffering conceptual framework in a multiwave, longitudinal sample of newlywed husbands and wives (N = 101 couples). Spousal support, chronic role strain, and marital satisfaction were assessed 4 times over 3 years and analyzed via actor-partner interdependence model and growth curve analytic techniques. Greater escalation in husbands' role strain over the first 3 years of marriage was associated with steeper declines in their marital satisfaction regardless of the adequacy of spousal support provided by their wives. In contrast, greater escalation in husbands' and wives' role strain was associated with significantly less marital decline for wives, and these links were bolstered when husbands provided wives with more adequate support. The present study is one of the first to explicate the underlying processes through which role strain and spousal support facilitate and mitigate the developmental course of marital satisfaction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)11-20
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Family Psychology
Volume22
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2008

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Marriage
Spouses
Buffers
Growth

Keywords

  • couples
  • marital
  • marriage
  • stress
  • support

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

A Longitudinal Investigation of Stress Spillover in Marriage : Does Spousal Support Adequacy Buffer the Effects? / Brock, Rebecca L.; Lawrence, Erika.

In: Journal of Family Psychology, Vol. 22, No. 1, 01.02.2008, p. 11-20.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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