A Highly Infectious Disease Care Network in the US Healthcare System

Aurora B. Le, Paul D. Biddinger, Philip W. Smith, Jocelyn J. Herstein, Deborah A Levy, Shawn G. Gibbs, John-Martin J Lowe

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

During the 2014-15 Ebola outbreak in West Africa, the United States responded by stratifying hospitals into 1 of 3 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)-designated categories - based on the hospital's ability to identify, isolate, assess, and provide care to patients with suspected or confirmed Ebola virus disease (EVD) - in an attempt to position the US healthcare system to safely isolate and care for potential patients. Now, with the Ebola epidemic quelled, it is crucial that we act on the lessons learned from the EVD response to broaden our national perspective on infectious disease mitigation and management, build on our newly enhanced healthcare capabilities to respond to infectious disease threats, develop a more cost-effective and sustainable model of infectious disease prevention, and continue to foster training so that the nation is not in a vulnerable position once more. We propose the formal creation of a US Highly Infectious Disease Care Network (HIDCN) modeled after 2 previous highly infectious disease consensus efforts in the United States and the European Union. A US Highly Infectious Disease Care Network can provide a common platform for the exchange of training, protocols, research, knowledge, and capability sharing among high-level isolation units. Furthermore, we envision the network will cultivate relationships among facilities and serve as a means of establishing national standards for infectious disease response, which will strengthen domestic preparedness and the nation's ability to respond to the next highly infectious disease threat.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)282-287
Number of pages6
JournalHealth Security
Volume15
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2017

Fingerprint

infectious disease
health care
contagious disease
Communicable Diseases
Delivery of Health Care
Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever
Disease
Patient Care
Viruses
threat
Western Africa
disease control
Disease control
ability
West Africa
European Union
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
Disease Management
Disease Outbreaks
social isolation

Keywords

  • Epidemic management/response
  • Hospital preparedness/response
  • Infectious diseases
  • Public health preparedness/response

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Emergency Medicine
  • Safety Research
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Cite this

Le, A. B., Biddinger, P. D., Smith, P. W., Herstein, J. J., Levy, D. A., Gibbs, S. G., & Lowe, J-M. J. (2017). A Highly Infectious Disease Care Network in the US Healthcare System. Health Security, 15(3), 282-287. https://doi.org/10.1089/hs.2016.0073

A Highly Infectious Disease Care Network in the US Healthcare System. / Le, Aurora B.; Biddinger, Paul D.; Smith, Philip W.; Herstein, Jocelyn J.; Levy, Deborah A; Gibbs, Shawn G.; Lowe, John-Martin J.

In: Health Security, Vol. 15, No. 3, 06.2017, p. 282-287.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Le, AB, Biddinger, PD, Smith, PW, Herstein, JJ, Levy, DA, Gibbs, SG & Lowe, J-MJ 2017, 'A Highly Infectious Disease Care Network in the US Healthcare System', Health Security, vol. 15, no. 3, pp. 282-287. https://doi.org/10.1089/hs.2016.0073
Le AB, Biddinger PD, Smith PW, Herstein JJ, Levy DA, Gibbs SG et al. A Highly Infectious Disease Care Network in the US Healthcare System. Health Security. 2017 Jun;15(3):282-287. https://doi.org/10.1089/hs.2016.0073
Le, Aurora B. ; Biddinger, Paul D. ; Smith, Philip W. ; Herstein, Jocelyn J. ; Levy, Deborah A ; Gibbs, Shawn G. ; Lowe, John-Martin J. / A Highly Infectious Disease Care Network in the US Healthcare System. In: Health Security. 2017 ; Vol. 15, No. 3. pp. 282-287.
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