A framework of ordered climate effects on water resources: A comprehensive bibliography

Elizabeth L. Chalecki, Peter H. Gleick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

An examination of the metadata for almost 900 bibliographic references on the effects of climate change and variability on U.S. water resources reveals strengths and weaknesses in our current knowledge. Considerable progress has been made in the modeling of climate change effects on first-order systems such as regional hydrology, but significant work remains to be done in understanding subsequent effects on the second-, third-, and fourth-order economic and social systems (e.g., agriculture, trade balance, and national economic development) that water affects. In order to remedy a recently-revealed lack of understanding about climate change on the part of the public, climate and water scientists should collaborate with social scientists in illuminating the effects of climate change and variability on the systems that affect how and where most people live.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1657-1665
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of the American Water Resources Association
Volume35
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1999

Fingerprint

Bibliographies
climate effect
Water resources
Climate change
bibliography
water resource
climate change
Economics
metadata
Hydrology
economic system
Metadata
Agriculture
Water
hydrology
economic development
agriculture
water
effect
climate

Keywords

  • Bibliographic data
  • Climate change
  • Climatology
  • Information dissemination
  • Water resources

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology
  • Water Science and Technology
  • Earth-Surface Processes

Cite this

A framework of ordered climate effects on water resources : A comprehensive bibliography. / Chalecki, Elizabeth L.; Gleick, Peter H.

In: Journal of the American Water Resources Association, Vol. 35, No. 6, 12.1999, p. 1657-1665.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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