A family based association study of DRD4, DAT1, and 5HTT and continuous traits of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder

L. Cinnamon Bidwell, Erik G. Willcutt, Matthew B. McQueen, John C. Defries, Richard K. Olson, Shelley D Smith, Bruce F. Pennington

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Despite its high heritability, genetic association studies of attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have often resulted in somewhat small, inconsistent effects. Refining the ADHD phenotype beyond a dichotomous diagnosis and testing associations with continuous information from the underlying symptom dimensions may result in more consistent genetic findings. This study further examined the association between ADHD and the DRD4, DAT1, and 5HTT genes by testing their association with multivariate phenotypes derived from continuous measures of ADHD symptom severity. DNA was collected in 202 families consisting of at least one ADHD proband and at least one parent or sibling. VNTR polymorphisms of the DRD4 and DAT1 genes were significantly associated with the continuous ADHD phenotype. The association with DRD4 was driven by both inattentive and hyperactive symptoms, while the association with DAT1 was driven primarily by inattentive symptoms. These results use novel methods to build upon important connections between dopamine genes and their final behavioral manifestation as symptoms of ADHD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)165-174
Number of pages10
JournalBehavior Genetics
Volume41
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2011

Fingerprint

Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity
phenotype
genes
minisatellite repeats
refining
gene
dopamine
Phenotype
heritability
testing
genetic polymorphism
Genes
DNA
polymorphism
Genetic Association Studies
family
Dopamine
methodology

Keywords

  • ADHD
  • Dopamine
  • FBAT
  • Genetic
  • Serotonin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Genetics
  • Genetics(clinical)

Cite this

A family based association study of DRD4, DAT1, and 5HTT and continuous traits of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. / Bidwell, L. Cinnamon; Willcutt, Erik G.; McQueen, Matthew B.; Defries, John C.; Olson, Richard K.; Smith, Shelley D; Pennington, Bruce F.

In: Behavior Genetics, Vol. 41, No. 1, 01.01.2011, p. 165-174.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bidwell, L. Cinnamon ; Willcutt, Erik G. ; McQueen, Matthew B. ; Defries, John C. ; Olson, Richard K. ; Smith, Shelley D ; Pennington, Bruce F. / A family based association study of DRD4, DAT1, and 5HTT and continuous traits of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. In: Behavior Genetics. 2011 ; Vol. 41, No. 1. pp. 165-174.
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