A Faith-Based Community Partnership to Address HIV/AIDS in the Southern United States: Implementation, Challenges, and Lessons Learned

Winston Abara, Jason D Coleman, Amanda Fairchild, Bambi Gaddist, Jacob White

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Though race and region are not by themselves risk factors for HIV infection, regional and racial disparities exist in the burden of HIV/AIDS in the US. Specifically, African Americans in the southern US appear to bear the brunt of this burden due to a complex set of upstream factors like structural and cultural influences that do not facilitate HIV/AIDS awareness, HIV testing, or sexual risk-reduction techniques while perpetuating HIV/AIDS-related stigma. Strategies proposed to mitigate the burden among this population have included establishing partnerships and collaborations with non-traditional entities like African American churches and other faith-based organizations. Though efforts to partner with the African American church are not necessarily novel, most of these efforts do not present a model that focuses on building the capacity of the African American church to address these upstream factors and sustain these interventions. This article will describe Project Fostering AIDS Initiatives That Heal (F.A.I.T.H), a faith-based model for successfully developing, implementing, and sustaining locally developed HIV/AIDS prevention interventions in African American churches in South Carolina. This was achieved by engaging the faith community and the provision of technical assistance, grant funding and training for project personnel. Elements of success, challenges, and lessons learned during this process will also be discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)122-133
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Religion and Health
Volume54
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2013

Fingerprint

African Americans
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
HIV
Capacity Building
Foster Home Care
Risk Reduction Behavior
HIV Infections
Faith-based
AIDS/HIV
Organizations
Population
Burden

Keywords

  • Community partnerships
  • Faith-based HIV/AIDS prevention programs
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Health promotion
  • Organizational capacity
  • Racial disparities
  • Sexual health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Religious studies

Cite this

A Faith-Based Community Partnership to Address HIV/AIDS in the Southern United States : Implementation, Challenges, and Lessons Learned. / Abara, Winston; Coleman, Jason D; Fairchild, Amanda; Gaddist, Bambi; White, Jacob.

In: Journal of Religion and Health, Vol. 54, No. 1, 01.01.2013, p. 122-133.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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