A Demands and Resources Approach to Understanding Faculty Turnover Intentions Due to Work–Family Balance

Megumi Watanabe, Christina D Falci

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Using data collected on tenure-line faculty at a research-intensive Midwestern university, this study explored predictors of faculty job turnover intentions due to a desire for a better work–family balance. We adopted Voydanoff’s theoretical framework and included demands and resources both within and spanning across the work and family domains. Results showed that work-related demands and resources were much stronger predictors of work–family turnover intentions than family-related demands or resources. Specifically, work-to-family negative spillover was positively associated with work–family turnover intentions, and two work-related resources (job satisfaction and supportive work–family culture) were negatively associated with work–family turnover intentions. On the other hand, family-related demands and resources (within the family domain or boundary-spanning from family to work) did not significantly predict work–family turnover intentions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)393-415
Number of pages23
JournalJournal of Family Issues
Volume37
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2016

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turnover
resources
job satisfaction
university

Keywords

  • demands and resources
  • faculty
  • turnover intentions
  • work–family balance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

A Demands and Resources Approach to Understanding Faculty Turnover Intentions Due to Work–Family Balance. / Watanabe, Megumi; Falci, Christina D.

In: Journal of Family Issues, Vol. 37, No. 3, 01.02.2016, p. 393-415.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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