A Day in the Life of a CVAD

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Patients are increasingly receiving therapy at home via central vascular access devices (CVADs). Limited data exist regarding patients' experiences with outpatient CVADs. This study characterized outpatient CVAD care via 14-day patient diaries. Information included location, frequency, and purpose of CVAD access episodes and who performed CVAD care. Across all patients, 77% of care was provided in the patient's home compared with other sites. Home care was provided via self-care (48%), by a family member/caregiver (25%), or by a nurse (27%). Flushing the device was the most frequent reason for device access (52%). An occlusion rate of 9.57 per 1000 device days was also noted. Further examination of CVAD maintenance and patient/care provider education is warranted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)125-131
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Infusion Nursing
Volume42
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2019

Fingerprint

Vascular Access Devices
Equipment and Supplies
Patient Care
Outpatients
Home Care Services
Self Care
Caregivers
Nurses
Maintenance
Education

Keywords

  • ambulatory care
  • central line complications
  • central line occlusion
  • central vascular access device
  • home health care
  • home infusion
  • patient education
  • patient engagement
  • self-care
  • standardized care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

A Day in the Life of a CVAD. / Nailon, Regina; Rupp, Mark Edmund; Lyden, Elizabeth.

In: Journal of Infusion Nursing, Vol. 42, No. 3, 01.05.2019, p. 125-131.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nailon, Regina ; Rupp, Mark Edmund ; Lyden, Elizabeth. / A Day in the Life of a CVAD. In: Journal of Infusion Nursing. 2019 ; Vol. 42, No. 3. pp. 125-131.
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