A cost of reproduction in Drosophila melanogaster: Stress susceptibility

Adam B. Salmon, David B. Marx, Lawrence G. Harshman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

104 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Little is known about physiological mechanisms that underlie the cost of reproduction. We tested the hypothesis that stress susceptibility is a cost of reproduction. In one test of our hypothesis, Drosophila melanogaster females were exposed to a juvenile hormone analog (methoprene) to stimulate egg production followed by stress assays. A sterile stock of D. melanogaster was employed as a control for reproduction. Exposure of fertile females to methoprene resulted in an increase in female reproduction and increased susceptibility to oxidative stress and starvation (compared to solvent controls). Sterile females did not exhibit a decrease in stress resistance. Mating also stimulated egg production. As a second test of our hypothesis, mated females were compared to virgin females. Mated fertile females were relatively susceptible to oxidative stress, but this relationship was not evident when mated and virgin sterile females were compared. The results of the present study support the hypothesis that stress susceptibility is a cost of reproduction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1600-1608
Number of pages9
JournalEvolution
Volume55
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2001

Fingerprint

Drosophila melanogaster
Reproduction
Costs and Cost Analysis
cost
Methoprene
methoprene
egg production
oxidative stress
Ovum
Oxidative Stress
juvenile hormone analogs
Juvenile Hormones
stress resistance
virgin females
stress tolerance
Starvation
starvation
hormone
testing
assay

Keywords

  • Cost of reproduction
  • Drosophila melanogaster
  • Juvenile hormone
  • Mating
  • Oxidation
  • Starvation
  • Stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Genetics
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

A cost of reproduction in Drosophila melanogaster : Stress susceptibility. / Salmon, Adam B.; Marx, David B.; Harshman, Lawrence G.

In: Evolution, Vol. 55, No. 8, 01.01.2001, p. 1600-1608.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Salmon, Adam B. ; Marx, David B. ; Harshman, Lawrence G. / A cost of reproduction in Drosophila melanogaster : Stress susceptibility. In: Evolution. 2001 ; Vol. 55, No. 8. pp. 1600-1608.
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