A Comparison of Full and Quasi Filters for Autobiographical Questions

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Some survey questions do not apply to all respondents. How to design these questions for both eligible and ineligible respondents is unclear. This article compares full filter (FF) and quasi filter (QF) designs for autobiographical questions in mail surveys. Using data from National Health, Well-being, and Perspectives Study, we examine the effect of type of filter on item nonresponse rates, response errors, and response distributions. We find that QF questions are more confusing to respondents, resulting in higher rates of item nonresponse and response errors than FF questions. Additionally, FF questions more successfully identify ineligible respondents, bringing estimates closer to national benchmarks. We recommend that survey designers use FF designs rather than QF designs for autobiographical questions in mail surveys.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)371-385
Number of pages15
JournalField Methods
Volume30
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2018

Fingerprint

response behavior
mail survey
well-being
health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anthropology

Cite this

A Comparison of Full and Quasi Filters for Autobiographical Questions. / Olson, Kristen M; Watanabe, Megumi; Smyth, Jolene D.

In: Field Methods, Vol. 30, No. 4, 01.11.2018, p. 371-385.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{ccb0f4eb15ca46d2b5db1d56bf4fa620,
title = "A Comparison of Full and Quasi Filters for Autobiographical Questions",
abstract = "Some survey questions do not apply to all respondents. How to design these questions for both eligible and ineligible respondents is unclear. This article compares full filter (FF) and quasi filter (QF) designs for autobiographical questions in mail surveys. Using data from National Health, Well-being, and Perspectives Study, we examine the effect of type of filter on item nonresponse rates, response errors, and response distributions. We find that QF questions are more confusing to respondents, resulting in higher rates of item nonresponse and response errors than FF questions. Additionally, FF questions more successfully identify ineligible respondents, bringing estimates closer to national benchmarks. We recommend that survey designers use FF designs rather than QF designs for autobiographical questions in mail surveys.",
author = "Olson, {Kristen M} and Megumi Watanabe and Smyth, {Jolene D}",
year = "2018",
month = "11",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/1525822X18795868",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "30",
pages = "371--385",
journal = "Field Methods",
issn = "1525-822X",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - A Comparison of Full and Quasi Filters for Autobiographical Questions

AU - Olson, Kristen M

AU - Watanabe, Megumi

AU - Smyth, Jolene D

PY - 2018/11/1

Y1 - 2018/11/1

N2 - Some survey questions do not apply to all respondents. How to design these questions for both eligible and ineligible respondents is unclear. This article compares full filter (FF) and quasi filter (QF) designs for autobiographical questions in mail surveys. Using data from National Health, Well-being, and Perspectives Study, we examine the effect of type of filter on item nonresponse rates, response errors, and response distributions. We find that QF questions are more confusing to respondents, resulting in higher rates of item nonresponse and response errors than FF questions. Additionally, FF questions more successfully identify ineligible respondents, bringing estimates closer to national benchmarks. We recommend that survey designers use FF designs rather than QF designs for autobiographical questions in mail surveys.

AB - Some survey questions do not apply to all respondents. How to design these questions for both eligible and ineligible respondents is unclear. This article compares full filter (FF) and quasi filter (QF) designs for autobiographical questions in mail surveys. Using data from National Health, Well-being, and Perspectives Study, we examine the effect of type of filter on item nonresponse rates, response errors, and response distributions. We find that QF questions are more confusing to respondents, resulting in higher rates of item nonresponse and response errors than FF questions. Additionally, FF questions more successfully identify ineligible respondents, bringing estimates closer to national benchmarks. We recommend that survey designers use FF designs rather than QF designs for autobiographical questions in mail surveys.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85053373615&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85053373615&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/1525822X18795868

DO - 10.1177/1525822X18795868

M3 - Article

VL - 30

SP - 371

EP - 385

JO - Field Methods

JF - Field Methods

SN - 1525-822X

IS - 4

ER -