A comparison of frequency and sources of nursing job stress perceived by intensive care, hospice and medical‐surgical nurses

M. J. Foxall, Lani M Zimmerman, R. Standley, B. Bené

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102 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study compared the frequency and sources of nursing job stress perceived by 35 intensive care (ICU), 30 hospice and 73 medical‐surgical nurses Analysis of variance revealed no significant differences among the three groups of nurses on the overall frequency of job stress Post‐hoc Tukey tests demonstrated a significant difference in three stress subscales among the three groups ICU and hospice nurses perceived significantly more stress than medical‐surgical nurses related to death and dying, ICU and medical‐surgical nurses perceived significantly more stress than hospice nurses related to floating, and medical‐surgical nurses perceived significantly more stress than ICU and hospice nurses related to work‐overload/staffing Spearman‐Rank Correlation revealed no significant correlations among the three groups in their rank‐ordering of the eight stress subscales Death and dying situations were the most stressful to ICU and hospice nurses, while work‐overload/staffing situations were the most stressful to medical‐surgical nurses Results of the study, although not generalizable, have implications for nurse managers

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)577-584
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of advanced nursing
Volume15
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1990

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Hospices
Critical Care
Nursing
Nurses
Nurse Administrators
Analysis of Variance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

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A comparison of frequency and sources of nursing job stress perceived by intensive care, hospice and medical‐surgical nurses. / Foxall, M. J.; Zimmerman, Lani M; Standley, R.; Bené, B.

In: Journal of advanced nursing, Vol. 15, No. 5, 05.1990, p. 577-584.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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