A comparison of direct versus indirect laryngoscopic visualization during endotracheal intubation of lightly embalmed cadavers utilizing the GlideScope®, Storz Medi Pack Mobile Imaging System™ and the New Storz CMAC™ videolaryngoscope.

Ben H. Boedeker, Thomas A. Nicholsal, Jennifer Carpenter, Leighton Singh, Mary A. Bernhagen, W. Bosseau Murray, Michael Charles Wadman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Studies indicate that the skills needed to use video laryngoscope systems are easily learned by healthcare providers. This study compared several video laryngoscopic (VL) systems and a direct laryngoscope (DL) view when used by medical residents practicing intubation on cadavers. The video devices used included the Storz Medi Pack Mobile Imaging System™, the Storz CMAC® VL System and the GlideScope®. After Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Department of Emergency Medicine (UNMC EM) residents were recruited and given a brief pre-study informational period. The cadavers were lightly embalmed. The study subjects were asked to perform intubations on two cadavers using both DL and VL while using the three different VL systems. Procedural data was recorded for each attempt and pre and post experience perceptions were collected. N=14. All subjects reported their varied previous intubation experience. The average airway score using DL: for the Storz VL was 1.54 (SD = 0.576) and for the C-MAC was 1.46 (SD = 0.637). Success in intubation of the standard airway using DL was 93% versus a 100% success rate when intubating with indirect VL visualization. Based on our data, we believe that the incorporation of VL into cadaver airway management training provided an improved learning environment for the study residents. In our study, the resident subjects were 93% successful with DL intubation even though 50% had less than 30 intubations. As well, there was a 100% success rate when intubating with indirect VL visualization. In conclusion, the researchers believe this cadaver model incorporated with VL is a powerful tool which may help improve the overall learning curve for orotracheal intubation. 2011.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)21-29
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of special operations medicine : a peer reviewed journal for SOF medical professionals
Volume11
Issue number2
StatePublished - Mar 1 2011

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Intratracheal Intubation
Laryngoscopes
Cadaver
Intubation
Airway Management
Learning Curve
Emergency Medicine
Research Ethics Committees
Health Personnel
Research Personnel
Learning
Equipment and Supplies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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title = "A comparison of direct versus indirect laryngoscopic visualization during endotracheal intubation of lightly embalmed cadavers utilizing the GlideScope{\circledR}, Storz Medi Pack Mobile Imaging System™ and the New Storz CMAC™ videolaryngoscope.",
abstract = "Studies indicate that the skills needed to use video laryngoscope systems are easily learned by healthcare providers. This study compared several video laryngoscopic (VL) systems and a direct laryngoscope (DL) view when used by medical residents practicing intubation on cadavers. The video devices used included the Storz Medi Pack Mobile Imaging System™, the Storz CMAC{\circledR} VL System and the GlideScope{\circledR}. After Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Department of Emergency Medicine (UNMC EM) residents were recruited and given a brief pre-study informational period. The cadavers were lightly embalmed. The study subjects were asked to perform intubations on two cadavers using both DL and VL while using the three different VL systems. Procedural data was recorded for each attempt and pre and post experience perceptions were collected. N=14. All subjects reported their varied previous intubation experience. The average airway score using DL: for the Storz VL was 1.54 (SD = 0.576) and for the C-MAC was 1.46 (SD = 0.637). Success in intubation of the standard airway using DL was 93{\%} versus a 100{\%} success rate when intubating with indirect VL visualization. Based on our data, we believe that the incorporation of VL into cadaver airway management training provided an improved learning environment for the study residents. In our study, the resident subjects were 93{\%} successful with DL intubation even though 50{\%} had less than 30 intubations. As well, there was a 100{\%} success rate when intubating with indirect VL visualization. In conclusion, the researchers believe this cadaver model incorporated with VL is a powerful tool which may help improve the overall learning curve for orotracheal intubation. 2011.",
author = "Boedeker, {Ben H.} and Nicholsal, {Thomas A.} and Jennifer Carpenter and Leighton Singh and Bernhagen, {Mary A.} and Murray, {W. Bosseau} and Wadman, {Michael Charles}",
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AU - Murray, W. Bosseau

AU - Wadman, Michael Charles

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