A communication system for the severely dysarthric speaker with an intact language system

D. R. Beukelman, K. Yorkston

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

58 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Two severely dysarthric speakers who had previously spelled entire messages on an alphabet board were taught a system in which they pointed to the first letter of each word as they spoke. Rate and intelligibility of speech produced with (aided) and without (unaided) the communication system were judged by observers who viewed videotaped samples. The rate of aided and unaided speech was markedly faster than spelling the entire message. Aided speech was slower but more intelligible than unaided speech. Further analysis revealed that intelligibility was influenced by at least 2 factors: rate and information provided by the identification of the first letter of each word. For one speaker both factors contributed to increased intelligibility, while for the other speaker only initial letter information appeared to influence intelligibility.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)265-270
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Speech and Hearing Disorders
Volume42
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1977

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communication system
Language
Communication
language
Speech Intelligibility
Intelligibility
Letters

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

A communication system for the severely dysarthric speaker with an intact language system. / Beukelman, D. R.; Yorkston, K.

In: Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, Vol. 42, No. 2, 01.01.1977, p. 265-270.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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