A clinician-judged technique for quantifying dysarthric speech based on single-word intelligibility

Kathryn M. Yorkston, David R. Beukelman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A clinician-judged technique for quantifying dysarthric speech based on single-word intelligibility was developed and evaluated in three experiments. Dysarthric speakers were audio-recorded as they read 50-word lists that had been randomly generated from sets of similar sounding words. These tapes were judged by speech pathologists using listening formats that were systematically altered by varying the number of choices available to the judges. Results indicated that some formats were more sensitive to differences that exist among severely dysarthric speakers and others were more sensitive to differences that exist among mild to moderately dysarthric speakers. Judge familiarity with the master word pool increased scores slightly but in a consistent and predictable fashion. Scores from different randomly generated word lists were similar when the influence of a speaker's day-to-day variability was controlled. Clinical implications and uses of this technique for the monitoring of change in speaker performance were discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)15-31
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Communication Disorders
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1980

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monitoring
experiment
performance
Intelligibility
Clinicians
Recognition (Psychology)
Pathologists
Word Lists
Experiment
Monitoring
Speech Pathologists
Familiarity
Controlled
Tape

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • LPN and LVN
  • Speech and Hearing

Cite this

A clinician-judged technique for quantifying dysarthric speech based on single-word intelligibility. / Yorkston, Kathryn M.; Beukelman, David R.

In: Journal of Communication Disorders, Vol. 13, No. 1, 01.1980, p. 15-31.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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