3D Bioprinting of heterogeneous aortic valve conduits with alginate/gelatin hydrogels

Bin Duan, Laura A. Hockaday, Kevin H. Kang, Jonathan T. Butcher

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

375 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Heart valve disease is a serious and growing public health problem for which prosthetic replacement is most commonly indicated. Current prosthetic devices are inadequate for younger adults and growing children. Tissue engineered living aortic valve conduits have potential for remodeling, regeneration, and growth, but fabricating natural anatomical complexity with cellular heterogeneity remain challenging. In the current study, we implement 3D bioprinting to fabricate living alginate/gelatin hydrogel valve conduits with anatomical architecture and direct incorporation of dual cell types in a regionally constrained manner. Encapsulated aortic root sinus smooth muscle cells (SMC) and aortic valve leaflet interstitial cells (VIC) were viable within alginate/gelatin hydrogel discs over 7 days in culture. Acellular 3D printed hydrogels exhibited reduced modulus, ultimate strength, and peak strain reducing slightly over 7-day culture, while the tensile biomechanics of cell-laden hydrogels were maintained. Aortic valve conduits were successfully bioprinted with direct encapsulation of SMC in the valve root and VIC in the leaflets. Both cell types were viable (81.4 ± 3.4% for SMC and 83.2 ± 4.0% for VIC) within 3D printed tissues. Encapsulated SMC expressed elevated alpha-smooth muscle actin, while VIC expressed elevated vimentin. These results demonstrate that anatomically complex, heterogeneously encapsulated aortic valve hydrogel conduits can be fabricated with 3D bioprinting.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1255-1264
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Biomedical Materials Research - Part A
Volume101 A
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2013

Fingerprint

Hydrogels
Alginate
Gelatin
Muscle
Hydrogel
Prosthetics
Tissue
Biomechanics
Vimentin
Public health
Medical problems
Encapsulation
Actins
Cells
alginic acid

Keywords

  • biomechanics
  • cell encapsulation
  • interstitial cell
  • smooth muscle
  • tissue engineering

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ceramics and Composites
  • Biomaterials
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Metals and Alloys

Cite this

3D Bioprinting of heterogeneous aortic valve conduits with alginate/gelatin hydrogels. / Duan, Bin; Hockaday, Laura A.; Kang, Kevin H.; Butcher, Jonathan T.

In: Journal of Biomedical Materials Research - Part A, Vol. 101 A, No. 5, 01.05.2013, p. 1255-1264.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Duan, Bin ; Hockaday, Laura A. ; Kang, Kevin H. ; Butcher, Jonathan T. / 3D Bioprinting of heterogeneous aortic valve conduits with alginate/gelatin hydrogels. In: Journal of Biomedical Materials Research - Part A. 2013 ; Vol. 101 A, No. 5. pp. 1255-1264.
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