SYNCHROTRON RADIATION BIOTECHNOLOGY

Project: Research project

Description

Synchrotron radiation from electron storage rings provides an extremely
intense and tunable source of x-rays which have broad applicability to
studies in structural molecular biology. A Biomedical Technology Resource
was established at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) in
1980 to study the structure and dynamics of biological materials using
protein crystallography, x-ray absorption spectroscopy and x-ray small
angle scattering. This proposal is for the continued funding, operation
and further development of this program. In each of the three methodology
areas, new initiatives are planned which are centered around novel x-ray
instrumentation and new detectors. Major aims include development of: an
"imaging plate" storage phosphor system for static and time-resolved
diffraction and scattering studies; advanced solid state HgI2 array
detectors for dilute XAS measurement; and a new instrument for XAS
investigations in the 2-4 keV spectral region. These developments will
continue to be supported by a strong core and core-collaborative research
programs that include both Stanford and outside scientists. Relevance is
to a number of important biological problems including the structure of
enzymes, metalloproteins, membrane-bound proteins and immunoglobulins; the
active site structure of metalloproteins involved in nitrogen fixation,
photosynthesis and oxygen metabolism; and how selected of these structures
change in different states or evolve in time as reactions occur. An
important goal is to provide support for these new facilities and to make
them widely available to the national and international scientific user
community. The program will continue to provide the opportunity for
training of graduate students and postdoctoral fellows in the use of this
state-of-the-art instrumentation. In early 1991, SSRL will be fully
dedicated to synchrotron research and is expected to double the running
time per year thus even more effectively serving the user community. The
Resource will continue to provide leadership in applications of synchrotron
radiation to solve problems at the forefront of biophysics and structural
molecular biology research.
StatusFinished
Effective start/end date3/1/802/28/15

Funding

  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health

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Calcineurin
Phosphoprotein Phosphatases
Calmodulin
Protein Kinases
Modulation
Phosphoric Monoester Hydrolases
Phosphotransferases
Phosphorylation
Substrates
Conformations
Chemical reactions
Fusion reactions
Crystal structure
Switches
Membranes
Controllers
Costs